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The Happiness of Giving: The Time-Ask Effect

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  • Wendy Liu
  • Jennifer Aaker
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    Abstract

    This research examines how a focus on time versus money can lead to two distinct mind-sets that affect consumers' willingness to donate to charitable causes. The results of three experiments, conducted both in the lab and in the field, reveal that asking individuals to think about "how much time they would like to donate" (vs. "how much money they would like to donate") to a charity increases the amount that they ultimately donate to the charity. Fueling this effect are differential mind-sets activated by time versus money. Implications for the research on time, money, and emotional well-being are discussed. (c) 2008 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc..

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    File URL: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdf/10.1086/588699
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Consumer Research.

    Volume (Year): 35 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 3 (05)
    Pages: 543-557

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jconrs:v:35:y:2008:i:3:p:543-557

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JCR/

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    Cited by:
    1. Jae-Eun Kim & Kim Johnson, 2013. "The Impact of Moral Emotions on Cause-Related Marketing Campaigns: A Cross-Cultural Examination," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 112(1), pages 79-90, January.
    2. Promothesh Chatterjee & Randall Rose & Jayati Sinha, 2013. "Why money meanings matter in decisions to donate time and money," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 109-118, June.
    3. Newman, George E. & Jeremy Shen, Y., 2012. "The counterintuitive effects of thank-you gifts on charitable giving," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 973-983.
    4. Michel, GĂ©raldine & Rieunier, Sophie, 2012. "Nonprofit brand image and typicality influences on charitable giving," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 65(5), pages 701-707.
    5. Luqiong Tong & Yuhuang Zheng & Ping Zhao, 2013. "Is money really the root of all evil? The impact of priming money on consumer choice," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 119-129, June.
    6. van Diepen, M. & Donkers, B. & Franses, Ph.H.B.F., 2008. "Does Irritation Induced by Charitable Direct Mailings Reduce Donations?," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2008-036-MKT, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus Uni.
    7. Sebastian Lehmann & Martin Reimann, 2012. "The influence of time and money on product evaluations - a neurophysiological analysis," FEMM Working Papers 120011, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
    8. Lin-Healy, Fern & Small, Deborah A., 2012. "Cheapened altruism: Discounting personally affected prosocial actors," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 117(2), pages 269-274.
    9. Binder, Martin & Freytag, Andreas, 2013. "Volunteering, subjective well-being and public policy," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 97-119.
    10. Aaker, Jennifer L. & Garbinsky, Emily N. & Vohs, Kathleen D., 2011. "Cultivating Admiration in Brands: Warmth, Competence, and Landing in the "Golden Quadrant"," Research Papers 2087, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    11. Aaker, Jennifer L. & Rudd, Melanie & Mogilner, Cassie, 2010. "If Money Doesn't Make You Happy, Consider Time," Research Papers 2067, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    12. Alexander L. Brown & Jonathan Meer & J. Forrest Williams, 2013. "Why Do People Volunteer? An Experimental Analysis of Preferences for Time Donations," NBER Working Papers 19066, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. HASAN, HAMID & Khan, Hayat, 2013. "Testing the Existence of Hedonic Adaptation and Inertia to Income with implications for Islamic economics: a case of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 44927, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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