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How Good Gets Better and Bad Gets Worse: Understanding the Impact of Affect on Evaluations of Known Brands

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  • Adaval, Rashmi
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    Abstract

    Participants experiencing positive or negative affect judged products described by brand and attribute information. Four studies using parameter-estimation and reaction-time procedures determined whether the impact of affect on brand name was the result of its influence on (a) participants' perception of its evaluative implications at the time of encoding or (b) the importance they attached to it while integrating it with other information to compute a judgment. Results showed that positive affect increased the extremity of the brand's evaluative implications (i.e., its scale value) rather than the importance (or weight) that participants attached to it. A fifth experiment demonstrated the implications of these findings for product choices made 24 hours after affect was induced. Copyright 2003 by the University of Chicago.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Consumer Research.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 3 (December)
    Pages: 352-67

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jconrs:v:30:y:2003:i:3:p:352-67

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JCR/

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    Cited by:
    1. Hilke Plassmann & Peter Kenning & Michael Deppe & Harald Kugel & Wolfram Schwindt, 2005. "Neural correlates of the affect heuristic during brand choice," Experimental 0509004, EconWPA.
    2. Lin, Chien-Huang & Chuang, Shih-Chieh & Kao, Danny T. & Kung, Chaang-Yung, 2006. "The role of emotions in the endowment effect," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 589-597, August.
    3. Chatzigeorgiou, Chryssoula & Christou, Evangelos & Kassianidis, Panagiotis & Sigala, Marianna, 2009. "Examining the Relationship between Emotions, Customer Satisfaction and Future Behavioral Intentions in Agrotourism," MPRA Paper 25355, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 28 Sep 2009.

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