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Sometimes It Just Feels Right: The Differential Weighting of Affect-Consistent and Affect-Inconsistent Product Information

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  • Adaval, Rashmi
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    Abstract

    An affect-confirmation process is proposed to explain the conditions in which information that is similar in valence (i.e., evaluatively consistent) with a person's mood is weighted more heavily in product judgments. Specifically, the affect that participants experience as a result of a transitory mood state may appear to either confirm or disconfirm their reactions to product information, leading them to give this information more or less weight when evaluating the product as a whole. This affective confirmation typically occurs when hedonic criteria are considered more important in evaluation than utilitarian criteria. Four experiments confirmed implications of this conceptualization. Copyright 2001 by the University of Chicago.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Consumer Research.

    Volume (Year): 28 (2001)
    Issue (Month): 1 (June)
    Pages: 1-17

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jconrs:v:28:y:2001:i:1:p:1-17

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JCR/

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    Cited by:
    1. Carl Obermiller & Alan Sawyer, 2011. "The effects of advertisement picture likeability on information search and brand choice," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 101-113, June.
    2. Geuens, Maggie & De Pelsmacker, Patrick & Faseur, Tine, 2011. "Emotional advertising: Revisiting the role of product category," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 64(4), pages 418-426, April.
    3. Inés López López & Salvador Ruiz de Maya, 2012. "When hedonic products help regulate my mood," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 701-717, September.
    4. Puccinelli, Nancy M. & Deshpande, Rohit & Isen, Alice M., 2007. "Should I stay or should I go? Mood congruity, self-monitoring and retail context preference," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 60(6), pages 640-648, June.
    5. Chiu, Hung-Chang & Hsieh, Yi-Ching & Li, Yu-Chuan & Lee, Monle, 2005. "Relationship marketing and consumer switching behavior," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 58(12), pages 1681-1689, December.
    6. Kim, Junyong & Gupta, Pranjal, 2012. "Emotional expressions in online user reviews: How they influence consumers' product evaluations," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 65(7), pages 985-992.
    7. Mai Kikumori & Akinori Ono, 2013. "Paradoxical Relationship between the Amount of Negative eWOM Messages and Positive Consumer Attitude," Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Discussion Paper Series 2012-035, Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Program.

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