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Knowledge, Information Mode, and the Attraction Effect

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  • Sen, Sankar
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    Abstract

    This article focuses on the complex role of category knowledge in context effects by examining how knowledge interacts with the mode of information presentation (verbal vs. numerical) to moderate the magnitude of the attraction effect. On the basis of Chakravarti and Lynch's framework for understanding context effects and prior research on consumer knowledge we delineate two distinct influences of knowledge on the choice process and demonstrate that the moderating influence of knowledge on the attraction effect varies with the information mode. When the choice set information is presented numerically, greater category knowledge attenuates the attraction effect, but when information is presented verbally, greater knowledge actually increases the size of the attraction effect. The implications of these findings for the role of knowledge in consumer context effects are discussed. Copyright 1998 by the University of Chicago.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Consumer Research.

    Volume (Year): 25 (1998)
    Issue (Month): 1 (June)
    Pages: 64-77

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jconrs:v:25:y:1998:i:1:p:64-77

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JCR/

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    Cited by:
    1. Celedon, Paulina & Milberg, Sandra & Sinn, Francisca, 2013. "Attraction and superiority effects in the Chilean marketplace: Do they exist with real brands?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(10), pages 1780-1786.
    2. Babin, Barry J. & Babin, Laurie, 2001. "Seeking something different? A model of schema typicality, consumer affect, purchase intentions and perceived shopping value," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 89-96, November.
    3. Davies, Antony & Cline, Thomas W., 2005. "A consumer behavior approach to modeling monopolistic competition," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 797-826, December.
    4. Holger Müller & Eike Kroll & Bodo Vogt, 2012. "Do real payments really matter? A re-examination of the compromise effect in hypothetical and binding choice settings," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 73-92, March.
    5. Bonaccio, Silvia & Reeve, Charlie L., 2006. "Consideration of preference shifts due to relative attribute variability," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 101(2), pages 200-214, November.
    6. Laroche, Michel & Takahashi, Ikuo & Kalamas, Maria & Teng, Lefa, 2005. "Modeling the selection of fast-food franchises among Japanese consumers," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 58(8), pages 1121-1131, August.
    7. Gonzalez-Prieto, David & Sallan, Jose M. & Simo, Pep & Carrion, Raimon, 2013. "Effects of the addition of simple and double decoys on the purchasing process of airline tickets," Journal of Air Transport Management, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 39-45.

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