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Consumers and Their Animal Companions

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  • Hirschman, Elizabeth C
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    Abstract

    Despite the widespread practice of keeping companion animals, virtually no consumer behavior studies have been conducted on this phenomenon. The present inquiry uses detailed depth interviews with consumers to expand three a priori themes--animals as friends, animals as self, and animals as family members--and to discuss two emergent themes: (1) companion animals' mediation between nature and culture, and (2) the socialization of consumers' companion animal preference patterns. Building on this knowledge, several directions for future research on companion animals are discussed. Copyright 1994 by the University of Chicago.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Consumer Research.

    Volume (Year): 20 (1994)
    Issue (Month): 4 (March)
    Pages: 616-32

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jconrs:v:20:y:1994:i:4:p:616-32

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JCR/

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    Cited by:
    1. Lancendorfer, Karen M. & Atkin, JoAnn L. & Reece, Bonnie B., 2008. "Animals in advertising: Love dogs? Love the ad!," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 384-391, May.
    2. Brownlie, Douglas, 2008. "Relationship climate canaries: A commentary Mosteller (2007) inspires," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 522-524, May.
    3. Mosteller, Jill, 2008. "Animal-companion extremes and underlying consumer themes," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 512-521, May.
    4. Brockman, Beverly K. & Taylor, Valerie A. & Brockman, Christopher M., 2008. "The price of unconditional love: Consumer decision making for high-dollar veterinary care," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 397-405, May.
    5. Coate Stephen & Knight Brian, 2010. "Pet Overpopulation: An Economic Analysis," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-59, December.
    6. Keaveney, Susan M., 2008. "Equines and their human companions," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 444-454, May.
    7. Denise DeLorme & George Zinkhan & Scott Hagen, 2004. "The Process of Consumer Reactions to Possession Threats and Losses in a Natural Disaster," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 185-199, December.
    8. Zhenguo Lin & Marcus Allen & Charles Carter, 2013. "Pet Policy and Housing Prices: Evidence from the Condominium Market," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 47(1), pages 109-122, July.
    9. Downey, Hilary & Ellis, Sarah, 2008. "Tails of animal attraction: Incorporating the feline into the family," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 434-441, May.
    10. Gentry, James W. & Kennedy, Patricia F. & Paul, Catherine & Hill, Ronald Paul, 1995. "Family transitions during grief: Discontinuities in household consumption patterns," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 67-79, September.
    11. McMullen, Cathi, 2008. "Romancing the alpaca: Passionate consumption, collection, and companionship," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 502-508, May.
    12. Dotson, Michael J. & Hyatt, Eva M., 2008. "Understanding dog-human companionship," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 457-466, May.
    13. Hill, Ronald Paul & Gaines, Jeannie & Wilson, R. Mark, 2008. "Consumer behavior, extended-self, and sacred consumption: An alternative perspective from our animal companions," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 553-562, May.
    14. Ridgway, Nancy M. & Kukar-Kinney, Monika & Monroe, Kent B. & Chamberlin, Emily, 2008. "Does excessive buying for self relate to spending on pets?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 392-396, May.
    15. Holak, Susan L., 2008. "Ritual blessings with companion animals," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 534-541, May.
    16. Beverland, Michael B. & Farrelly, Francis & Lim, Elison Ai Ching, 2008. "Exploring the dark side of pet ownership: Status- and control-based pet consumption," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 490-496, May.
    17. Corinne Lamour & Catherine De La Robertie & Gérard Cliquet, 2013. "Prescription d'achats complexes: Proposition de définitions et d'un modèle," Post-Print hal-00784362, HAL.
    18. Bettany, Shona & Daly, Rory, 2008. "Figuring companion-species consumption: A multi-site ethnography of the post-canine Afghan hound," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 408-418, May.

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