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The Influence of Purchase Quantity and Display Format on Consumer Preference for Variety

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Author Info

  • Simonson, Itamar
  • Winer, Russell S

Abstract

The authors propose that what consumers buy can be systematically influenced by how much they buy. They hypothesize that, as the number of items purchased in a category on a shopping occasion increases, a consumer is more likely to select product variants (e.g. yogurt flavors) that s/he does not usually purchase. They used yogurt scanner data to support this hypothesis. This study also revealed that consumers were more likely to select their regular brands when purchasing more containers of yogurt on a given occasion. A laboratory experiment showed that this reflects the combined impact of purchase quantity and product-display format (i.e., the by-brand display of yogurt in supermarkets) on consumer choice. Copyright 1992 by the University of Chicago.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Consumer Research.

Volume (Year): 19 (1992)
Issue (Month): 1 (June)
Pages: 133-38

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jconrs:v:19:y:1992:i:1:p:133-38

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JCR/

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Cited by:
  1. Arno Riedl, 2009. "Behavioral and Experimental Economics Can Inform Public Policy: Some Thoughts," CESifo Working Paper Series 2902, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Ribeiro, Ricardo, 2010. "Consumer demand for variety: intertemporal effects of consumption, product switching and pricing policies," MPRA Paper 25812, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Read, Daniel & Antonides, Gerrit & van den Ouden, Laura & Trienekens, Harry, 2001. "Which Is Better: Simultaneous or Sequential Choice?," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 54-70, January.
  4. Wu, Pei-Hsun & Kao, Danny Tengti, 2011. "Goal orientation and variety seeking behavior: The role of decision task," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 65-72, February.
  5. Breugelmans Els & Campo Katia & Gijsbrechts Els, 2005. "Shelf Sequence and Proximity Effects on Online Grocery Choices," Research Memorandum 052, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
  6. Roland Helm & Sebastian Landschulze, 2009. "Optimal stimulation level theory, exploratory consumer behaviour and product adoption: an analysis of underlying structures across product categories," Review of Managerial Science, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 41-73, March.
  7. Pflug, Georg Ch. & Pichler, Alois & Wozabal, David, 2012. "The 1/N investment strategy is optimal under high model ambiguity," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 410-417.
  8. Harper Roehm & Michelle Roehm, 2004. "Variety-Seeking and Time of Day: Why Leader Brands Hope Young Adults Shop in the Afternoon, but Follower Brands Hope for Morning," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 213-221, December.
  9. Hu, Michael Y. & Tsoukalas, Christos, 2003. "Explaining consumer choice through neural networks: The stacked generalization approach," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 146(3), pages 650-660, May.
  10. Els Breugelmans & Katia Campo & Els Gijsbrechts, 2007. "Shelf sequence and proximity effects on online grocery choices," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 117-133, June.
  11. Turley, L. W. & Milliman, Ronald E., 2000. "Atmospheric Effects on Shopping Behavior: A Review of the Experimental Evidence," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 193-211, August.
  12. Harlam, Bari A. & Krishna, Aradhna & Lehmann, Donald R. & Mela, Carl, 1995. "Impact of bundle type, price framing and familiarity on purchase intention for the bundle," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 57-66, May.
  13. Elisa Cavezzali & Gloria Gardenal & Ugo Rigoni, 2012. "Risk taking, diversification behavior and financial literacy of individual investors," Working Papers 17, Department of Management, Università Ca' Foscari Venezia.

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