Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

In Search of Homo Economicus: Cognitive Noise and the Role of Emotion in Preference Consistency

Contents:

Author Info

  • Leonard Lee
  • On Amir
  • Dan Ariely
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Understanding the role of emotion in forming preferences is critical in helping firms choose effective marketing strategies and consumers make appropriate consumption decisions. In five experiments, participants made a set of binary product choices under conditions designed to induce different degrees of emotional decision processing. The results consistently indicate that greater reliance on emotional reactions during decision making is associated with greater preference consistency and less cognitive noise. Additionally, the results of a meta‐analytical study based on data from all five experiments further show that products that elicit a stronger emotional response are more likely to yield consistent preferences.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/10.1086/597160
    Download Restriction: Access to the online full text or PDF requires a subscription.

    File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/full/10.1086/597160
    Download Restriction: Access to the online full text or PDF requires a subscription.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Consumer Research.

    Volume (Year): 36 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 173 - 187

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jconrs:doi:10.1086/597160

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JCR/

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Jeffrey V. Butler & Luigi Guiso & Tullio Jappelli, 2013. "Manipulating Reliance on Intuition Reduces Risk and Ambiguity Aversion," CSEF Working Papers 327, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    2. Van Kerckhove, Anneleen & Geuens, Maggie & Vermeir, Iris, 2012. "Intention superiority perspectives on preference-decision consistency," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 65(5), pages 692-700.
    3. Sebastian Lehmann & Martin Reimann, 2012. "The influence of time and money on product evaluations - a neurophysiological analysis," FEMM Working Papers 120011, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucp:jconrs:doi:10.1086/597160. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Journals Division).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.