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Education Expenditure Responses to Crop Loss in Indonesia: A Gender Bias

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Author Info

  • Cameron, Lisa A
  • Worswick, Christopher

Abstract

This paper studies the impact of crop loss on the level of educational expenditure of Indonesian households using data from the 1993 Indonesian Family Life Survey. The data are unique in that they contain self-reported information on crop loss and on household responses to crop loss. Thirty-four percent of households that experience a crop loss report that they responded by cutting household expenditure.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Volume (Year): 49 (2001)
Issue (Month): 2 (January)
Pages: 351-63

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:v:49:y:2001:i:2:p:351-63

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/EDCC/

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Cited by:
  1. Paul Gertler & David I. Levine & Minnie Ames, 2004. "Schooling and Parental Death," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 211-225, February.
  2. Tobing, Elwin, 2011. "Taxation, human capital formation, and long-run growth with private investment in education," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 48-60, February.
  3. David I. Levine & Minnie Ames, 2004. "Gender Bias and The Indonesian Financial Crisis: Were Girls Hit Hardest?," Development and Comp Systems 0407005, EconWPA.
  4. Cristina Cattaneo, 2012. "Migrants’ international transfers and educational expenditure," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 20(1), pages 163-193, 01.
  5. Martin Rama, 2002. "Globalization and Workers in Developing Countries," Economics Study Area Working Papers 41, East-West Center, Economics Study Area.
  6. Jungho Kim & Alexia Prskawetz, 2010. "External Shocks, Household Consumption and Fertility in Indonesia," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 503-526, August.
  7. KIZILCA, F. Kemal, 2013. "Booze and women: Gendering labor market outcomes of secular consumption patterns in a Muslim society," MPRA Paper 51832, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. World Bank, 2012. "The Welfare Effects of Extreme Weather Events : Insights from Three APEC Case Studies," World Bank Other Operational Studies 13039, The World Bank.
  9. Emily Hannum, 2005. "Market transition, educational disparities, and family strategies in rural china: New evidence on gender stratification and development," Demography, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 275-299, May.
  10. Yoshito Takasaki, 2012. "Do natural disasters decrease the gender gap in schooling?," Tsukuba Economics Working Papers 2012-001, Economics, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba.
  11. Kevane, Michael & Levine, David I., 2000. "The Changing Status of Daughters in Indonesia," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt09m817c0, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
  12. Koolwal, Gayatri B., 2007. "Son Preference and Child Labor in Nepal: The Household Impact of Sending Girls to Work," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 881-903, May.
  13. Joyce Chen, 2012. "Dads, disease, and death: determinants of daughter discrimination," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 119-149, January.
  14. SHI, Xinzheng, 2011. "Famine, fertility, and fortune in china," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 244-259, June.
  15. Levine, David & Kevane, Michael, 2003. "Are Investments in Daughters Lower when Daughters Move Away? Evidence from Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 1065-1084, June.
  16. Korkeala, Outi & Newhouse, David & Duarte, Mafalda, 2009. "Distributional impact analysis of past climate variability in rural Indonesia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5070, The World Bank.

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