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Productivity of Public Spending, Sectoral Allocation Choices, and Economic Growth

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  • Baffes, John
  • Shah, Anwar

Abstract

The authors examine the composition of public spending and its implications for economic growth. They use a translog production function by treating gross domestic product as the output and labor, private capital, and several types of public sector capital stocks as the inputs, using time series data for 25 countries for 1965-84. The production functions of all but four countries exhibited increasing returns to scale. The highest output elasticity was for human resource development capital, followed by private capital and labor. Output elasticity of infrastructure capital was found to be relatively small, with the exception of Latin American countries where it exhibited relatively high values. Military capital had negative output elasticity in slightly more than half of the cases considered. The results suggest that reshaping public spending priorities in favor of human resource development and away from military spending would positively stimulate world economic renewal.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Volume (Year): 46 (1998)
Issue (Month): 2 (January)
Pages: 291-303

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:v:46:y:1998:i:2:p:291-303

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/EDCC/

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References

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  1. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1991. "A sensitivity analysis of cross-country growth regressions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 609, The World Bank.
  2. Shah, Anwar, 1988. "Public infrastructure and private sector profitability and productivity in Mexico," Policy Research Working Paper Series 100, The World Bank.
  3. Hulten, Charles R, 1992. "Growth Accounting When Technical Change Is Embodied in Capital," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 964-80, September.
  4. Antle, John M, 1983. "Infrastructure and Aggregate Agricultural Productivity: International Evidence," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(3), pages 609-19, April.
  5. Berndt, Ernst & Hansson, Bengt, 1992. "Measuring the Contribution of Capital in Sweden," Working Paper Series 365, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  6. Murphy, Kevin M. & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W., 1989. "Industrialization and the Big Push," Scholarly Articles 3606235, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  7. McElroy, F W, 1969. "Returns to Scale, Euler's Theorem, and the Form of Production Functions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(2), pages 275-79, April.
  8. Christensen, Laurits R & Jorgenson, Dale W & Lau, Lawrence J, 1973. "Transcendental Logarithmic Production Frontiers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 55(1), pages 28-45, February.
  9. Landau, Daniel, 1993. "The economic impact of military expenditures," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1138, The World Bank.
  10. Shah, Anwar, 1992. "Dynamics of Public Infrastructure, Industrial Productivity and Profitability," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(1), pages 28-36, February.
  11. Alicia H. Munnell, 1990. "Why has productivity growth declined? Productivity and public investment," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Jan, pages 3-22.
  12. Berndt, Ernst R & Hansson, Bengt, 1992. " Measuring the Contribution of Public Infrastructure Capital in Sweden," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 94(0), pages S151-68, Supplemen.
  13. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
  14. Lynde, Catherine & Richmond, J, 1993. "Public Capital and Total Factor Productivity," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 34(2), pages 401-14, May.
  15. Charles R. Hulten, 1992. "Growth Accounting When Technical Change is Embodied in Capital," NBER Working Papers 3971, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Gordon R. Richards, 1992. "Endogenous Technological Advance and Postwar Economic Growth: A Production Function Analysis," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 315-331, Summer.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Randolph, Susan & Bogetic, Zeljko & Hefley, Dennis, 1996. "Determinants of public expenditure on infrastructure : transportation and communication," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1661, The World Bank.
  2. Swaroop, Vinaya & DEC, 1994. "The public finance of infrastructure : issues and options," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1288, The World Bank.
  3. Ferreira, Pedro Cavalcanti Gomes & Nascimento, Leandro Gonçalves do, 2005. "Welfare and Growth Effects of Alternative Fiscal Rules for Infrastructure Investment in Brazil," Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 604, FGV/EPGE Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
  4. Peng, Ling & Hong, Yongmiao, 2013. "Productivity spillovers among linked sectors," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 44-61.
  5. Campos, Nauro F & Coricelli, Fabrizio, 2002. "Growth in Transition: What we Know, What we Don't and What we Should," CEPR Discussion Papers 3246, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. World Bank, 2003. "Argentina : Reforming Policies and Institutions for Efficiency and Equity of Public Expenditures," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14637, The World Bank.
  7. Wei Zou & Fen Zhang & Ziyin Zhuang & Hairong Song, 2008. "Transport Infrastructure, Growth, and Poverty Alleviation: Empirical Analysis of China," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 9(2), pages 345-371, November.
  8. Rao, M. Govinda, 1998. "Accommodating public expenditure policies: the case of fast growing Asian economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 673-694, April.
  9. Ahmed, Sadiq & Ranjan, Priya, 1995. "Promoting growth in Sri Lanka : lessons from East Asia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1478, The World Bank.
  10. Johannes Steinbrecher & Christian Thater & Marcel Thum & Oskar Krohmer, 2010. "Langfristige Prognose der Einnahmeentwicklung für den Landeshaushalt des Freistaates Sachsen bis zum Jahr 2025 : Gutachten im Auftrag des Sächsischen Staatsministeriums der Finanzen," ifo Dresden Studien, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 57, October.
  11. W. Robert Reed & Nurul Sidek, 2013. "A Replication of "Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Fiscal Policies on Long-Run Growth" (European Journal of Political Economy, 2004)," Working Papers in Economics 13/33, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
  12. Poot, Jacques, 1999. "A meta-analytic study of the role of government in long-run economic growth," ERSA conference papers ersa99pa171, European Regional Science Association.
  13. Fan, Shenggen & Chan-Kang, Connie, 2005. "Road development, economic growth, and poverty reduction in China:," Research reports 138, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  14. Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot, Victoria, 2002. "Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Fiscal Policies on Long-Run Growth," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 02-028/3, Tinbergen Institute, revised 23 Apr 2003.
  15. Pritchett, Lant, 1996. "Mind your P's and Q's : the cost of public investment is not the value of public capital," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1660, The World Bank.
  16. Celal Kucuker, 2003. "Türkiye Ýktisat Kongresi Büyüme Stratejileri Çalýþma Grubu," Working Papers 2003/5, Turkish Economic Association.
  17. Ahmed, Sadiq, 1994. "Explaining Pakistan's high growth performance over the past two decades : can it be sustained ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1341, The World Bank.

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