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Chinese Graduate Students and U.S. Scientific Productivity

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  • Patrick Gaulé

    (CERGE-EI, a joint workplace of Charles University and the Economics Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic)

  • Mario Piacentini

    (OECD)

Abstract

The migration of young Chinese scientists to undertake graduate studies in U.S. universities is arguably one of the most important recent episodes of skilled migration. Using a new data set covering around 16,000 Ph.D. graduates in 161 U.S. chemistry departments, we show that Chinese students have a scientific output during their thesis that is significantly higher than other students. In fact, conditional on acceptance into the same programs, Chinese students perform about as well as the awardees of the NSF doctoral fellowship program. These results shed new light on the benefits of student migration on scientific productivity of destination countries. © 2013 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Review of Economics and Statistics.

Volume (Year): 95 (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 698-701

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:95:y:2013:i:2:p:698-701

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Related research

Keywords: Chinese graduate students; student performance; scientific productivity; United States;

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Cited by:
  1. William R. Kerr, 2013. "U.S. High-Skilled Immigration, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship: Empirical Approaches and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 19377, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Sari Pekkala Kerr & William R. Kerr & William F. Lincoln, 2014. "Firms and the Economics of Skilled Immigration," NBER Working Papers 20069, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Jürgen Janger & Klaus Nowotny, 2013. "Career choices in academia," WWWforEurope Working Papers series, WWWforEurope 36, WWWforEurope.
  4. Paula E. Stephan, 2010. "The Biomedical Workforce in the US: An Example of Positive Feedbacks," ICER Working Papers, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research 11-2010, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
  5. Paula Stephan & Giuseppe Scellato & Chiara Franzoni, 2014. "International Competition for PhDs and Postdoctoral Scholars: What Does (and Does Not) Matter," NBER Chapters, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, in: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 15 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Sari Pekkala Kerr & William R. Kerr & William F. Lincoln, 2014. "Skilled Immigration and the Employment Structures of U.S. Firms," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan wp1071, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  7. Max Nathan, 2014. "The wider economic impacts of high-skilled migrants: a survey of the literature for receiving countries," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 1-20, December.

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