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The Effects of Gender Interactions in the Lab and in the Field

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Author Info

  • Kate Antonovics

    (Department of Economics, University of California at San Diego)

  • Peter Arcidiacono

    (Department of Economics, Duke University)

  • Randall Walsh

    (Department of Economics, University of Colorado at Boulder)

Abstract

An important issue with conducting economic analysis in the lab is whether the results generalize to real-world environments where the stakes and subject pool are considerably different. We examine data from the game show The Weakest Link to determine whether the gender of one's opponent affects performance. We then attempt to replicate the competitive structure of the game show in the lab with an undergraduate subject pool. The results in the lab only match when we both employ high stakes in the lab (> $50) and limit our analysis to young contestants in the game show (age > 33). Copyright by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal The Review of Economics and Statistics.

Volume (Year): 91 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 152-162

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:91:y:2009:i:1:p:152-162

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Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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Cited by:
  1. Alan Manning & Farzad Saidi, 2008. "Understanding the Gender Pay Gap: What's Competition Got to Do with It?," CEP Discussion Papers, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE dp0898, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  2. Azmat, Ghazala & Petrongolo, Barbara, 2014. "Gender and the Labor Market: What Have We Learned from Field and Lab Experiments?," IZA Discussion Papers 8135, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Migheli, Matteo, 2010. "Gender at Work: Productivity and Incentives," AICCON Working Papers, Associazione Italiana per la Cultura della Cooperazione e del Non Profit 74-2010, Associazione Italiana per la Cultura della Cooperazione e del Non Profit.
  4. Yann Girard & Florian Hett, 2013. "Competitiveness in dynamic group contests: Evidence from combined field and lab data," Working Papers, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz 1303, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, revised 01 Apr 2013.
  5. Manuel F. Bagues & Maria Jose Perez Villadoniga, 2008. "Why do I like people like me?," Business Economics Working Papers, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía de la Empresa wb080601, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
  6. Victor Lavy, 2008. "Gender Differences in Market Competitiveness in a Real Workplace: Evidence from Performance-based Pay Tournaments among Teachers," NBER Working Papers 14338, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Ghazala Azmat & Nagore Iriberri, 2010. "The Provision of Relative Performance Feedback Information: An Experimental Analysis of Performance and Happiness," Working Papers, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics 454, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  8. Ghazala Azmat & Barbara Petrongolo, 2014. "Gender and the Labor Market: What Have We Learned from Field and Lab Experiments?," CEP Occasional Papers, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE 40, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  9. Fredrik Carlsson & Haoran He & Peter Martinsson, 2013. "Easy come, easy go," Experimental Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 190-207, June.
  10. Bertrand, Marianne, 2011. "New Perspectives on Gender," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier.
  11. Christopher Cotton & Frank McIntyre & Joseph Price, 2010. "The Gender Gap Cracks Under Pressure: A Detailed Look at Male and Female Performance Differences During Competitions," Working Papers, University of Miami, Department of Economics 2010-18, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  12. Carlsson, Fredrik & He, Haoran & Martinsson, Peter, 2009. "Easy come, easy go - The role of windfall money in lab and field experiments," Working Papers in Economics, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics 374, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  13. Jenny Säve-Söderbergh & Gabriella Sjögren Lindquist, 2014. "Children Do Not Behave Like Adults: Gender Gaps in Performance and Risk Taking within a Random Social Context in the High-StakesGame Shows Jeopardy and Junior Jeopardy," CESifo Working Paper Series, CESifo Group Munich 4595, CESifo Group Munich.
  14. De Paola, Maria & Gioia, Francesca & Scoppa, Vincenzo, 2013. "Are Females Scared of Competing with Males? Results from a Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 7799, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. Dato, Simon & Nieken, Petra, 2013. "Gender Differences in Competition and Sabotage," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association 79750, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  16. Cotton, Christopher & McIntyre, Frank & Price, Joseph, 2013. "Gender differences in repeated competition: Evidence from school math contests," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 52-66.

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