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Intratemporal Substitution And Government Spending

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  • Robert A. Amano
  • Tony S. Wirjanto

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the idea that a general model of consumption should allow for the direct effect of government expenditures in a two-good permanent-income model. We show, given an assumed preference specification, that there is a cointegration restriction implied by an intraperiod first-order condition of the model. This restriction leads to a linear deterministic cointegration relation between government spending, private consumption, and their relative price that is supported by the data. Using this restriction to recover the preference parameters, we estimate the intraperiod elasticity of substitution for both government and private consumption to be about 0.9. Overall, we find consistent empirical evidence in support of our model. © 1997 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal The Review of Economics and Statistics.

Volume (Year): 79 (1997)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 605-609

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:79:y:1997:i:4:p:605-609

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Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Michael Ben-Gad, 2008. "The Two Sector Endogenous Growth Model and the Intertemporal Elasticity of Substitution: An Atlas," 2008 Meeting Papers 512, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Ogaki, M. & Park, Y.Y., 1989. "A Cointegration Approach To Estimating Preference Parameters," RCER Working Papers 209, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  3. Nieh, Chien-Chung & Ho, Tsung-wu, 2006. "Does the expansionary government spending crowd out the private consumption?: Cointegration analysis in panel data," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 133-148, February.
  4. Yum K. Kwan, 2007. "The Direct Substitution between Government and Private Consumption in East Asia," NBER Chapters, in: Fiscal Policy and Management in East Asia, NBER-EASE, Volume 16, pages 45-58 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Amir Kia, 2004. "Deficits, Debt Financing, Monetary Policy and Inflation in Developing Countries: Internal or External Factors?," Carleton Economic Papers 04-15, Carleton University, Department of Economics.
  6. Ben-Gad, Michael, 2012. "The two sector endogenous growth model: An atlas," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 706-722.
  7. Marattin, Luigi, 2007. "Private and public consumption and counter-cyclical fiscal policy," MPRA Paper 9493, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Dec 2007.
  8. Ho, Tsung-wu, 2001. "The government spending and private consumption: a panel cointegration analysis," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 95-108.
  9. Tsung-wu Ho, 2001. "Analyzing the Crowding-out Problems of Taiwan," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 115-131, June.
  10. L. Marattin & S. Salotti, 2009. "The Response of Private Consumption to Different Public Spending Categories: VAR Evidence from UK," Working Papers 670, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  11. Hafedh Bouakez & Nooman Rebei, 2003. "Why Does Private Consumption Rise After a Government Spending Shock?," Working Papers 03-43, Bank of Canada.
  12. Amir Kia, 2006. "Deficits, Debt Financing, Monetary Policy and Inflation in Developing Countries: Internal or External Factors? Evidence from Iran," Carleton Economic Papers 06-03, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised Nov 2006.
  13. Yum K. Kwan, 2006. "The Direct Substitution Between Government and Private Consumption in East Asia," NBER Working Papers 12431, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Elena Marquez de la Cruz & Ana Martinez-Canete & Ines Perez-Soba Aguilar, 2007. "Intertemporal preference parameters for some European monetary union countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(8), pages 997-1011.
  15. Pedro Gomes & Davide Debortoli, 2012. "Labor and Profit Taxation, and the Supply of Public Capital," 2012 Meeting Papers 325, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  16. Auteri, Monica & Costantini, Mauro, 2010. "A panel cointegration approach to estimating substitution elasticities in consumption," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 782-787, May.
  17. Elena Márquez de la Cruz, 2005. "La elasticidad de sustitución intertemporal y el consumo duradero: un análisis para el caso español," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 29(3), pages 455-481, September.

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