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Inequality in Male and Female Earnings: The Role of Hours and Wages

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  • Doiron, Denise J
  • Barrett, Garry F

Abstract

The authors decompose annual earnings into hours of work and hourly earnings and analyze male-female differences in earnings inequality using Canadian data. Their results indicate that the larger female inequality in earnings is due to a greater inequality in the distribution of hours of work. The distributions of wages for men and women are either statistically indistinguishable or more equal for women. The authors compare two data points, 1988 and 1981, and find the same structure in the gender comparisons. Also, changes between 1988 and 1981 in earnings inequality are generated from movements in the hours distributions. Copyright 1996 by MIT Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Review of Economics & Statistics.

Volume (Year): 78 (1996)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 410-20

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:78:y:1996:i:3:p:410-20

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Cited by:
  1. Morissette, Rene, 1995. "Pourquoi l'inegalite des gains hebdomadaires a-t-elle augmente au Canada?," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 1995080f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
  2. Berube, Charles & Morissette, Rene, 1996. "Aspects longitudinaux de l'inegalite des revenus au Canada," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 1996094f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
  3. Joachim Merz & Derik Burgert, 2005. "Arbeitszeitarrangements - Neue Ergebnisse aus der nationalen Zeitbudgeterhebung 2001/02 im Zeitvergleich zu 1991/92," FFB-Discussionpaper 47, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
  4. Anna Lukiyanova, 2013. "Earnings inequality and informal Employment in Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 37/EC/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  5. Lars Osberg, 2003. "Long Run Trends in Income Inequality in the United States, UK, Sweden, Germany and Canada: A Birth Cohort View," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 29(1), pages 121-141, Winter.
  6. Berube, Charles & Morissette, Rene, 1996. "Longitudinal Aspects of Earnings Inequality in Canada," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1996094e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  7. Joachim Merz & Paul Böhm & Derik Burgert, 2005. "Timing, Fragmentation of Work and Income Inequality - An Earnings Treatment Effects Approach," FFB-Discussionpaper 48, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
  8. Morissette, Rene, 1995. "Why Has Inequality in Weekly Earnings Increased in Canada?," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1995080e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  9. Gengsheng Qin & Baoying Yang & Nelly Belinga-Hall, 2013. "Empirical likelihood-based inferences for the Lorenz curve," Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Springer, vol. 65(1), pages 1-21, February.
  10. Rene Morissette & Anick Johnson, 2005. "Are good jobs disappearing in Canada?," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Aug, pages 23-56.
  11. Lars Osberg, 1996. "Economic Growth, Income Distribution and Economic Welfare in Canada 1975-1994," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive econgrow, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
  12. Johnson, Anick & Morissette, Rene, 2005. "Are Good Jobs Disappearing in Canada?," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2005239e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  13. Benjamin, Dwayne & Brandt, Loren, 1997. "Land, Factor Markets, and Inequality in Rural China: Historical Evidence," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 460-494, October.
  14. Fiona MacPhail, 1998. "Moving Beyond Statistical Validity in Economics," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 119-149, November.
  15. Jeff Borland, 2000. "Economic Explanations of Earnings Distribution Trends in the International Literature and Application to New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 00/16, New Zealand Treasury.

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