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Job Search and Immigrant Assimilation: An Earnings Frontier Approach

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  • Daneshvary, Nasser, et al

Abstract

This study examines labor market assimilation by measuring the information utilized by immigrants during job search. Assimilation is assumed to occur whenever such information increases with length of residence in the United States (and repeated job searches). The authors assert that information utilized during job search reduces differentials between actual and "potential" (maximum attainable) earnings. Coauthors are Henry W. Herzog, Jr.; Richard A. Hofler; and Alan M. Schlottmann. Copyright 1992 by MIT Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Review of Economics & Statistics.

Volume (Year): 74 (1992)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 482-92

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:74:y:1992:i:3:p:482-92

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Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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Web: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journal-home.tcl?issn=00346535

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Cited by:
  1. Somnath Chattopadhyay, 2011. "Earnings efficiency and poverty dominance analysis: a spatial approach," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(3), pages 2298-2318.
  2. Geoffrey Carliner, 1996. "The Wages and Language Skills of U.S. Immigrants," NBER Working Papers 5763, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Delia Furtado & Nikolaos Theodoropoulos, 2009. "Intermarriage and Immigrant Employment: The Role of Networks," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0906, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  4. Polachek, Solomon & Xiang, Jun, 2005. "The Effects of Incomplete Employee Wage Information: A Cross-Country Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 1735, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Sharif, Najma R. & Dar, Atul A., 2007. "An Empirical Investigation of the Impact of Imperfect Information on Wages in Canada," Review of Applied Economics, Review of Applied Economics, vol. 3(1-2).
  6. Audra J. Bowlus & Masashi Miyairi & Chris Robinson, 2013. "Immigrant Job Search Assimilation in Canada," University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity Working Papers 20136, University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity.
  7. José Romero, 2013. "What circumstances lead a government to promote brain drain?," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 108(2), pages 173-202, March.
  8. Farré, Lídia & Fasani, Francesco, 2013. "Media exposure and internal migration — Evidence from Indonesia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 48-61.
  9. Guenter Lang, 2004. "How Different are Wages from Wage Potentials? - Analyzing the earnings disadvantage of immigrants in Germany," Discussion Paper Series 256, Universitaet Augsburg, Institute for Economics.
  10. Javier Vázquez-Grenno, 2012. "Job search methods in times of crisis: native and immigrant strategies in Spain," Working Papers 2012/19, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  11. Lovell, C. A. Knox, 1995. "Econometric efficiency analysis: A policy-oriented review," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 452-461, February.
  12. Guenter Lang, 2000. "Native-Immigrant Wage Differentials in Germany - Assimilation, Discrimination, or Human Capital?," Discussion Paper Series 197, Universitaet Augsburg, Institute for Economics.
  13. Fang, Tony & Samnani, Al-Karim & Novicevic, Milorad M. & Bing, Mark N., 2012. "Liability-of-Foreignness Effects on Job Success of Immigrant Job Seekers," IZA Discussion Papers 6742, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Bishop, John A. & Grodner, Andrew & Liu, Haiyong & Chiou, Jong-Rong, 2007. "Gender earnings differentials in Taiwan: A stochastic frontier approach," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 934-945, December.
  15. Jensen, Uwe & Gartner, Hermann & Rässler, Susanne, 2006. "Measuring overeducation with earnings frontiers and multiply imputed censored income data," IAB Discussion Paper 200611, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  16. Gabriel Romero, 2007. "Skilled Migration: When Should A Government Restrict Migration Of Skilled Workers?," Working Papers. Serie AD 2007-25, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  17. Daniel Millimet, 2005. "Job search skills, employer size and wages," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(2), pages 95-100.
  18. Muto, Megumi, 2009. "The impacts of mobile phone coverage expansion and personal networks on migration: evidence from Uganda," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51898, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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