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An Integrated Test for Electoral Cycles in the U.S. Economy

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  • Haynes, Stephen E
  • Stone, Joe A

Abstract

This paper offers the first integrated test of the electoral model of business cycles. The test begins with unrestricted estimates of presidential electoral patterns in U.S. economic outcomes (real GNP, unemployment, and inflation) and policies (money growth and the adjusted budget surplus). These estimates are then used to determine whether the estimated electoral patterns in macropolicy yield predicted electoral patterns for macro outcomes that are consistent with estimates of both actual electoral patterns in outcomes and voting behavior. The results indicate that four-year electoral cycles in macroeconomic outcomes and policies are strongly significant for the United States for the period 1951I to 1986II. Copyright 1989 by MIT Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Review of Economics & Statistics.

Volume (Year): 71 (1989)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 426-34

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:71:y:1989:i:3:p:426-34

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Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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Web: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journal-home.tcl?issn=00346535

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Cited by:
  1. Price, Simon, 1997. " Political Business Cycles and Macroeconomic Credibility: A Survey," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 92(3-4), pages 407-27, September.
  2. Kräussl, Roman & Lucas, André & Rijsbergen, David R. & van der Sluis, Pieter Jelle & Vrugt, Evert B., 2010. "Washington meets Wall Street: A closer examination of the presidential cycle puzzle," CFS Working Paper Series 2010/06, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  3. Jon Faust & John Irons, 1996. "Money, politics and the post-war business cycle," International Finance Discussion Papers 572, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. Faust, Jon & Irons, John S., 1999. "Money, politics and the post-war business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 61-89, February.
  5. Hendrik Dalen & Otto Swank, 1996. "Government spending cycles: Ideological or opportunistic?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 89(1), pages 183-200, October.
  6. Block, Steven A. & Vaaler, Paul M., 2004. "The price of democracy: sovereign risk ratings, bond spreads and political business cycles in developing countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 917-946, October.
  7. Alpanda, Sami & Honig, Adam, 2007. "Political Monetary Cycles and a New de facto Ranking of Central Bank Independence," MPRA Paper 5898, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Chappell, Henry Jr. & Havrilesky, Thomas M. & McGregor, Rob Roy, 1995. "Policymakers, institutions, and central bank decisions," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 113-136, May.

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