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The Earnings of Soviet Workers: Evidence from the Soviet Interview Project

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  • Gregory, Paul R
  • Kohlhase, Janet E

Abstract

Micro data gathered by the Soviet Interview Project provide one of the first opp ortunities for Western researchers to investigate the determinants of Soviet earnings. The data show that Soviet labor markets operate in many respects like U.S. labor markets, yet institutional differences remain. The most striking institutional impact is that Soviet workers are rewarded and penalized for political behavior external to the firm. As in the U.S., education and experience are rewarded; men earn more than women. However the Soviet pattern of returns to education is different, returns to experience are lower and occupational segregation of women is less important. Copyright 1988 by MIT Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Review of Economics & Statistics.

Volume (Year): 70 (1988)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 23-35

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:70:y:1988:i:1:p:23-35

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Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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Cited by:
  1. Neil Gandal & Gordon H. Hanson & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2000. "Technology, Trade, and Adjustment to Immigration in Israel," NBER Working Papers 7962, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Barry Reilly, 1999. "The gender pay gap in Russia during the transition, 1992-96," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(1), pages 245-264, March.
  3. Barbezat D, 1993. "Occupational segmentation by sex in the world," ILO Working Papers, International Labour Organization 298900, International Labour Organization.
  4. Sofia Cheidvasser, 2000. "The Educated Russian's Curse: Returns to Education in the Russian Federation," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers, Econometric Society 0246, Econometric Society.
  5. Danzer, Alexander M. & Danzer, Natalia, 2014. "The Long-Run Consequences of Chernobyl: Evidence on Subjective Well-Being, Mental Health and Welfare," Discussion Papers in Economics, University of Munich, Department of Economics 20969, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  6. Linz, Susan J., 2004. "Motivating Russian workers: analysis of age and gender differences," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 261-289, July.
  7. Newell, Andrew & Reilly, Barry, 1996. "The gender wage gap in Russia: Some empirical evidence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 337-356, October.
  8. Tamar Khitarishvili, 2010. "Assessing the Returns to Education in Georgia," Economics Working Paper Archive, Levy Economics Institute wp_608, Levy Economics Institute.
  9. Irina Soboleva, 2011. "Patterns of Human Capital Development in Russia: Meeting the Challenge of Market Reforms and Globalization," Institutions and Economies (formerly known as International Journal of Institutions and Economies), Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, vol. 3(2), pages 235-257, July.
  10. Danzer, Alexander M. & Danzer, Natalia, 2011. "The Long-Term Effects of the Chernobyl Catastrophe on Subjective Well-Being and Mental Health," IZA Discussion Papers 5906, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. World Bank, 2003. "The Russian Labor Market : Moving from Crisis to Recovery," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15007, August.
  12. Semykina, Anastasia & Linz, Susan J., 2007. "Gender differences in personality and earnings: Evidence from Russia," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 387-410, June.
  13. Hugo Benitez-Silva & Sofia Sheidvasser, 2000. "The Educated Russian's Curse: Returns to Education in the Russian Federation," Department of Economics Working Papers, Stony Brook University, Department of Economics 00-05, Stony Brook University, Department of Economics.
  14. Natalia Kyui, 2013. "Expansion of Higher Education, Employment and Wages: Evidence from the Russian Transition," Working Papers, Bank of Canada 13-45, Bank of Canada.
  15. Flanagan, Robert J., 1998. "Were communists good human capitalists? The case of the Czech Republic," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 295-312, September.
  16. Arabsheibani, Reza & Mussurov, Altay, 2006. "Returns to Schooling in Kazakhstan: OLS and Instrumental Variables Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 2462, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  17. Danzer, Natalia, 2013. "Job Satisfaction and Self-Selection into the Public or Private Sector: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 7644, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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