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The Economic Theory of Fertility Decline

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  • Leibenstein, Harvey
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Quarterly Journal of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 89 (1975)
    Issue (Month): 1 (February)
    Pages: 1-31

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    Handle: RePEc:tpr:qjecon:v:89:y:1975:i:1:p:1-31

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    Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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    Web: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journal-home.tcl?issn=00335533

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    Cited by:
    1. Petra Stein & Sebastian Willen & Monika Pavetic, 2014. "Couples' fertility decision-making," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(63), pages 1697-1732, June.
    2. Becker, Sascha O. & Cinnirella, Francesco & Wößmann, Ludger, 2013. "Does womens education affect fertility? Evidence from pre-demographic transition Prussia," Munich Reprints in Economics 20263, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    3. Angelika Tölke, 2003. "Insecurities in employment and occupational careers and their impact on the transition to fatherhood in Western Germany," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-016, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Brian C. O'Neill & Deborah Balk & Melanie Brickman & Markos Ezra, 2001. "A Guide to Global Population Projections," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 4(8), pages 203-288, June.
    5. Auer, Wolfgang & Danzer, Natalia & Rainer, Helmut, 2013. "Fixed-term Employment and Fertility: Theory and Evidence from German Micro Data," Munich Reprints in Economics 20177, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    6. Mohammed Sabihuddin Butt & Haroon Jamal, 1993. "Determinants of Marital Fertility in Pakistan: An Application of the "Synthesis Framework"," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 32(2), pages 199-220.
    7. repec:ese:iserwp:2005-20 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Becker, Sascha O; Cinnirella, Francesco; Woessmann, Ludger, 2011. "Does Parental Education Affect Fertility? Evidence from Pre-Demographic Transition Prussia," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 41, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    9. Sarah Sinclair & Jonathan Boymal & Ashton De Silva, 2012. "A Re‐Appraisal of the Fertility Response to the Australian Baby Bonus," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 88(s1), pages 78-87, 06.
    10. Michaela Kreyenfeld, 2005. "Economic uncertainty and fertility postponement: evidence from German panel data," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2005-034, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    11. Michaela Kreyenfeld & Gunnar Andersson & Ariane Pailhé, 2012. "Economic uncertainty and family dynamics in Europe (Introduction to special issue of Demographic Research)," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2012-006, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    12. Macunovich, Diane J., 1998. "Race and relative income/price of time effects on U.S. fertility," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 365-400.
    13. Angelika Tölke & Martin Diewald, 2003. "Insecurities in employment and occupational careers and their impact on the transition to fatherhood in Western Germany," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 9(3), pages 41-68, September.
    14. repec:cge:warwcg:41 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Michaela Kreyenfeld & Gunnar Andersson & Ariane Pailhé, 2012. "Economic Uncertainty and Family Dynamics in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(28), pages 835-852, December.
    16. Deborah Freedman & Arland Thornton, 1982. "Income and fertility: The elusive relationship," Demography, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 65-78, February.
    17. Tommy Bengtsson & Martin Dribe, 2014. "The historical fertility transition at the micro level," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(17), pages 493-534, February.

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