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Counterparty Risk in Financial Contracts: Should the Insured Worry about the Insurer?

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Author Info

  • James R. Thompson

    (School of Accounting and Finance, University of Waterloo.)

Abstract

We analyze the effect of counterparty risk on financial insurance contracts, using the case of credit risk transfer in banking. This paper posits a new moral hazard problem on the insurer side of the market, which causes the insured party to be exposed to excessive counterparty risk. We find that this counterparty risk can create an incentive for the insured party to reveal superior information about the likelihood of a claim. In particular, a unique separating equilibrium may exist, even in the absence of any costly signaling device. (c) 2010 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology..

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File URL: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/pdfplus/10.1162/qjec.2010.125.3.1195
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 125 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 1195-1252

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:qjecon:v:125:y:2010:i:3:p:1195-1252

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Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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Web: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journal-home.tcl?issn=00335533

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Cited by:
  1. Stephens, Eric & Thompson, James, 2012. "Who Participates in Risk Transfer Markets? The Role of Transaction Costs and Counterparty Risk," Working Papers 2012-12, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
  2. Viral V. Acharya & Alberto Bisin, 2011. "Counterparty Risk Externality: Centralized Versus Over-the-counter Markets," NBER Working Papers 17000, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Jean-Sébastien Fontaine & Héctor Pérez Saiz & Joshua Slive, 2012. "When Lower Risk Increases Profit: Competition and Control of a Central Counterparty," Working Papers 12-35, Bank of Canada.
  4. Biais, Bruno & Heider, Florian & Hoerova, Marie, 2012. "Clearing, counterparty risk and aggregate risk," Working Paper Series 1481, European Central Bank.
  5. Darrell Duffie & Martin Scheicher & Guillaume Vuillemey, 2014. "Central Clearing and Collateral Demand," NBER Working Papers 19890, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Bolton, Patrick & Oehmke, Martin, 2013. "Strategic conduct in credit derivative markets," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 652-658.
  7. Biais, Bruno & Heider, Florian & Hoerova, Marie, 2012. "Risk-sharing or risk-taking? Counterparty risk, incentives and margins," Working Paper Series 1413, European Central Bank.
  8. Acharya, Viral & Bisin, Alberto, 2014. "Counterparty risk externality: Centralized versus over-the-counter markets," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 149(C), pages 153-182.
  9. Marti G. Subrahmanyam & Dragon Yongjun Tang & Sarah Qian Wang, 2012. "Does the Tail Wag the Dog? The Effect of Credit Default Swaps on Credit Risk," Working Papers 292012, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
  10. Stephens, Eric & Thompson, James, 2012. "Separation Without Mutual Exclusion in Financial Insurance," Working Papers 2012-8, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
  11. Patrick Bolton & Martin Oehmke, 2011. "Should Derivatives be Privileged in Bankruptcy?," NBER Working Papers 17599, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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