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A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation of the Effects of Public Health Subsidies for STD Testing

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  • Philipson, Tomas J
  • Posner, Richard A

Abstract

This paper investigates, both theoretically and empirically, the private demand for sexually transmitted disease testing and for protection against infection with emphasis on testing for the AIDS virus (HIV) and on the effects of public subsidies for such testing on the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases. The authors discuss the theoretical conditions under which subsidizing testing either increases or decreases disease incidence and provide evidence on the empirical significance of those conditions. Copyright 1995, the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 110 (1995)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 445-74

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:qjecon:v:110:y:1995:i:2:p:445-74

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Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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Web: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journal-home.tcl?issn=00335533

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Cited by:
  1. St├ęphane Mechoulan, 2006. "Risky Sexual Behavior, Testing and New HIV Treatments," Working Papers tecipa-239, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  2. Aureo de Paula & Gil Shapira & Petra E. Todd, 2008. "How Beliefs About HIV Status affect Risky Behaviors: Evidence From Malawi, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 08-041, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 02 Dec 2008.
  3. Robert J. Brent, 2010. "A social cost-benefit criterion for evaluating Voluntary Counseling and Testing with an application to Tanzania," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(2), pages 154-172.
  4. Simeon Schudy & Verena Utikal, 2012. "The Influence of (Im)perfect Data Privacy on the Acquisition of Personal Health Data," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2012-12, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
  5. Christopher Auld, 2001. "Disentangling the Effects of Morbidity and Life Expectancy on Labor Market Outcomes," Working Papers 2001-16, Department of Economics, University of Calgary, revised 05 Dec 2001.
  6. Philipson, Tomas, 2000. "Economic epidemiology and infectious diseases," Handbook of Health Economics, in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 33, pages 1761-1799 Elsevier.
  7. Xue Qiao, 2012. "Unsafe sex, AIDS and development," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 105(3), pages 263-279, April.
  8. Aureo de Paula & Gil Shapira & Petra Todd, 2008. "How Beliefs about HIV Status Affect Risky Behaviors: Evidence from Malawi," PIER Working Paper Archive 08-035, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  9. Neeraj Sood & Yanyu Wu, 2013. "The Impact of Insurance and HIV Treatment Technology on HIV Testing," NBER Working Papers 19397, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Aureo de Paula & Gil Shapira & Petra E. Todd, 2008. "How Beliefs about HIV Status Affect Risky Behaviors: Evidence from Malawi1, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 09-031, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 01 Aug 2009.
  11. Adeline Delavande & Dana Goldman & Neeraj Sood, 2007. "Criminal Prosecution and HIV-related Risky Behavior," NBER Working Papers 12903, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Mama Ouattara, 2004. "HIV infection and economic growth," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 141-149.
  13. Dow, William H. & Philipson, Tomas, 1996. "An empirical examination of the implications of assortative matching on the incidence of HIV," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 735-749, December.

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