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Monopoly Agenda Control and Asymmetric Information

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  • Banks, Jeffrey S

Abstract

This paper extends the Romer-Rosenthal model of monopoly agenda control to an environment where only the agenda setter knows with certainty the outcome associated with a failed proposal. The presence of this asymmetric information implies that any "take-it-or-leave-it" proposal may provide information crucial to the decision calculus of the voters, a fact which an optimal proposal strategy will incorporate. The equilibrium behavior of the agenda setter and voters is characterized and contrasted with that in the complete information environment, and a number of empirical predictions concerning the nature of elections with monopoly controlled agendas are derived. Copyright 1990, the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 105 (1990)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 445-64

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:qjecon:v:105:y:1990:i:2:p:445-64

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Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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Cited by:
  1. Robin Boadway & Motohiro Sato, 2006. "Bureaucratic Advice and Political Governance," Working Papers 1070, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  2. Mariano Tommasi, 1995. "Why Does it Take a Nixon to go to China?," UCLA Economics Working Papers 728, UCLA Department of Economics.
  3. Alejandro Saporiti & Fernando Tohmé, 2001. "Order-restricted preferences and strategy-proof social choices rules," CEMA Working Papers: Serie Documentos de Trabajo. 191, Universidad del CEMA.
  4. Dimitrios Xefteris, 2011. "Referenda as a Catch-22," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 121-138, June.
  5. Rosen Valchev & Antony Davies, 2009. "Transparency, Performance, and Agency Budgets: A Rational Expectations Modeling Approach," Working Papers 2009-004, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, Research Program on Forecasting.
  6. Yannis Karagiannis, 2007. "Economic Theories and the Science of Inter-Branch Relations," RSCAS Working Papers 2007/04, European University Institute.

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