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A Behavioral Explanation for Nominal Wage Rigidity during the Great Depression

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  • O'Brien, Anthony Patrick

Abstract

Nominal wages in manufacturing were left unchanged by the large decline in nominal demand that marked the first two years of the Great Depression. This rigidity in nominal wages is explained using the tools of the behavioral theory of the firm. The emphasis is on the reasons firms changed their decision rules linking fluctuations in final sales to changes in nominal wages. Copyright 1989, the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 104 (1989)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 719-35

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:qjecon:v:104:y:1989:i:4:p:719-35

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Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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Web: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journal-home.tcl?issn=00335533

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Cited by:
  1. Randall E. Parker & Phillip Rothman & Original: August 2000. This version: June 2003., . "An Examination of the Asymmetric Effects of Money Supply Shocks in the Pre-World War I and Interwar Periods," Working Papers 0302, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
  2. Lundborg, Per, 2000. "Taxes, Risk Aversion and Unemployment Insurance as Causes of Wage Rigidity," Working Paper Series 160, Trade Union Institute for Economic Research.
  3. Ben Bernanke & Harold James, 1990. "The Gold Standard, Deflation, and Financial Crisis in the Great Depression: An International Comparison," NBER Working Papers 3488, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Darby, Julia & Hart, Robert A., 2002. "Wages, Productivity, and Work Intensity in the Great Depression," IZA Discussion Papers 543, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Harold L. Cole & Lee E. Ohanian, 2000. "Re-examining the contributions of money and banking shocks to the U.S. Great Depression," Staff Report 270, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  6. Michael D. Bordo & Christopher J. Erceg & Charles L. Evans, 1997. "Money, sticky wages, and the Great Depression," International Finance Discussion Papers 591, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  7. Christopher Hanes, 2000. "Nominal Wage Rigidity and Industry Characteristics in the Downturns of 1893, 1929, and 1981," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1432-1446, December.
  8. Robert A. Margo, 1992. "Employment and Unemployment in the 1930s," NBER Working Papers 4174, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Taylor, Jason E. & Neumann, Todd C., 2013. "The effect of institutional regime change within the new deal on industrial output and labor markets," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 582-598.
  10. George A. Akerlof, 2007. "The Missing Motivation in Macroeconomics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 5-36, March.

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