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Studying Learning in Games Using Eye-Tracking

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  • Daniel T. Knoepfle
  • Joseph Tao-yi Wang
  • Colin F. Camerer

Abstract

We report results from an exploratory study using eye-tracking recording of information acquisition by players in a game theoretic learning paradigm. Eye-tracking is used to observe what information subjects look at in 4 � 4 normal-form games; the eye-tracking results favor sophisticated learning over adaptive learning and lend support to anticipatory or sophisticated models of learning in which subjects look at payoffs of other players to anticipate what those players might do. The decision data, however, are poorly fit by the simple anticipatory models we examine. We discuss how eye-tracking studies of information acquisition can fit into research agenda seeking to understand complex strategic behavior and consider methodological issues that must be addressed in order to maximize their potential. (c) 2009 by the European Economic Association.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Journal of the European Economic Association.

Volume (Year): 7 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2-3 (04-05)
Pages: 388-398

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:jeurec:v:7:y:2009:i:2-3:p:388-398

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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Eye-Tracking
    by Liam Delaney in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2010-03-19 20:05:00
Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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Cited by:
  1. Erik O. Kimbrough & Nikolaus Robalino & Arthur J. Robson, 2013. "The Evolution of 'Theory of Mind': Theory and Experiments," Levine's Working Paper Archive 786969000000000735, David K. Levine.
  2. Caplin, Andrew & Dean, Mark, 2011. "Search, choice, and revealed preference," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 6(1), January.
  3. Yingyao Hu & Yutaka Kayaba & Matt Shum, 2010. "Nonparametric learning rules from bandit experiments: the eyes have it!," CeMMAP working papers CWP15/10, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  4. Elena Reutskaja & Rosemarie Nagel & Colin F. Camerer & Antonio Rangel, 2011. "Search Dynamics in Consumer Choice under Time Pressure: An Eye-Tracking Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(2), pages 900-926, April.
  5. Irenaeus Wolff & J. Philipp Reiss, 2012. "Incentive Effects of Funding Contracts: An Experiment," TWI Research Paper Series 78, Thurgauer Wirtschaftsinstitut, Universität Konstanz.
  6. Müller, Julia & Schwieren, Christiane, 2011. "More than Meets the Eye: an Eye-tracking Experiment on the Beauty Contest Game," Working Papers 0516, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.

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