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The Effect of School Accountability Systems on the Level and Distribution of Student Achievement

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Author Info

  • Eric A. Hanushek

    (Stanford University and National Bureau of Economic Research,)

  • Margaret E. Raymond

    (Stanford University and CREDO,)

Abstract

The use of school accountability in the United States to improve student performance began in the separate states during the 1980s and was elevated through the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. Evaluating the impact of accountability is difficult because it applies to entire states and can be confused with other changes in the states. We consider how the differential introduction of accountability across states affects growth in student performance on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Our preliminary analysis finds that: 1) accountability improves scores of all students; 2) there is no significant difference between simply reporting scores and attaching consequences; and, 3) while accountability tends to narrow the Hispanic-White gap, it tends to widen the Black-White gap in scores. The last finding suggests that a single policy instrument cannot be expected to satisfy multiple simultaneous goals. (JEL: I2, H7, J4) Copyright (c) 2004 The European Economic Association.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Journal of the European Economic Association.

Volume (Year): 2 (2004)
Issue (Month): 2-3 (04/05)
Pages: 406-415

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:jeurec:v:2:y:2004:i:2-3:p:406-415

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Cited by:
  1. Schlotter, Martin & Schwerdt, Guido & Woessmann, Ludger, 2010. "Econometric Methods for Causal Evaluation of Education Policies and Practices: A Non-Technical Guide," IZA Discussion Papers 4725, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Andrews, Matthew, 2008. "Is Black Economic Empowerment a South African Growth Catalyst? (Or Could It Be...)," Working Paper Series rwp08-033, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  3. Ludger Wö�mann, 2006. "Bildungspolitische Lehren aus den internationalen Schülertests: Wettbewerb, Autonomie und externe Leistungsüberprüfung," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7(3), pages 417-444, 08.
  4. Ludger Woessmann, 2004. "Institutional Comparisons in Educational Production," CESifo DICE Report, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 2(4), pages 03-06, 01.
  5. Ludger Wößmann, 2005. "Leistungsfördernde Anreize für das Schulsystem," Ifo Schnelldienst, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 58(19), pages 18-27, October.
  6. Justine S. Hastings & Jeffrey M. Weinstein, 2007. "No Child Left Behind: Estimating the Impact on Choices and Student Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 13009, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Craig, Steven G. & Imberman, Scott A. & Perdue, Adam, 2013. "Does it pay to get an A? School resource allocations in response to accountability ratings," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 30-42.
  8. Eric A. Hanushek & Margaret E. Raymond, 2005. "Does school accountability lead to improved student performance?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(2), pages 297-327.
  9. Friesen, Jane & Krauth, Brian, 2007. "Sorting and inequality in Canadian schools," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(11-12), pages 2185-2212, December.
  10. Pierre Koning, 2010. "School responsiveness to quality ranking: An empirical analysis of secondary education in the Netherlands," CPB Discussion Paper 149, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  11. Colleen Donovan & David N. Figlio & Mark Rush, 2006. "Cramming: The Effects of School Accountability on College-Bound Students," NBER Working Papers 12628, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Ludger Wößmann, 2008. "Efficiency and equity of European education and training policies," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 199-230, April.
  13. Thijs Bol & Herman Werfhorst, 2013. "GINI DP 81: The Measurement of Tracking, Vocational Orientation, and Standardization of Educational Systems: a Comparative Approach," GINI Discussion Papers 81, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
  14. Oster, Emily, 2009. "Does increased access increase equality? Gender and child health investments in India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 62-76, May.

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