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The Moral Imperative and Social Rationality of Government-Guaranteed Employment and Reskilling

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  • Jon Wisman

Abstract

Unemployment exacts a high cost to its victims, not only in lost income, but also in terms of quality of life (insecurity, depression, abandoned families, divorce, suicide and poorer health). It also exacts a high cost to society in terms of lost output, foregone tax revenue, depreciating human capital, and increased costs of welfare, crime and health care. Yet modern wealthy societies have, principally for the sake of price stability and to avoid the budget costs of a full remedy, chosen to tolerate a substantial level of permanent unemployment. This article explores the moral conditions of this social choice and its rationality in terms of social welfare. It makes and develops support for two claims: society's tolerance of involuntary unemployment is morally wrong, and it is socially and economically irrational. It concludes that government should guarantee employment by serving as employer of last resort and where appropriate provide for retraining.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00346760902968405
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Review of Social Economy.

Volume (Year): 68 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 35-67

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Handle: RePEc:taf:rsocec:v:68:y:2010:i:1:p:35-67

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Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RRSE20

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Related research

Keywords: unemployment; employer of last resort; social morality; social rationality; happiness;

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Cited by:
  1. Jon D. Wisman, 2012. "The Growth Trap, Ecological Devastation, and the Promise of Guaranteed Employment," Working Papers 2012-17, American University, Department of Economics.
  2. Jon D. Wisman & Aaron Pacitti, 2013. "Ending the Crisis With Guaranteed Employment and Retraining," Working Papers 2013-12, American University, Department of Economics.
  3. Antoine Godin, 2012. "Job Guarantee: a Structuralist Perspective," DEM Working Papers Series 016, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Management.

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