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On Marx's Analysis of Money Hoarding in the Turnover of Capital

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  • Costas Lapavitsas
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    Abstract

    The formation of money hoards, which underpins the demand for money, is typically treated by mainstream monetary theory as originating in the motives of the rational individual. In contrast, Marx's discussion of money hoarding treats hoard formation as a necessary tendency of capitalist production and circulation rather than as a result of the individual's predilections. Based on Marx's analysis, this article identifies several structural reasons for money hoard formation in the circuit of capital. It is also shown that Marx's discussion, despite its insight, suffers from a technical error in analysing the overlapping of production and circulation time in the circuit, and in drawing the implications for hoarding. Finally, it is argued that the broader significance of capitalist money hoarding lies in the foundations it provides for the emergence of the credit system.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/095382500406521
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Review of Political Economy.

    Volume (Year): 12 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 219-235

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:revpoe:v:12:y:2000:i:2:p:219-235

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    1. Arie Arnon, 1984. "Marx's Theory of Money: the Formative Years," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 555-575, Winter.
    2. Lapavitsas, Costas, 1994. "The Banking School and the Monetary Thought of Karl Marx," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(5), pages 447-61, October.
    3. Costas Lapavitsas, 1997. "Two Approaches to the Concept of Interest-Bearing Capital," International Journal of Political Economy, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 27(1), pages 85-106, April.
    4. Foley, Duncan K., 1982. "Realization and accumulation in a Marxian model of the circuit of capital," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 300-319, December.
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    Cited by:
    1. Passarella, Marco & Baron, Hervé, 2013. "Capital's Pons Asinorum: the Rate of Turnover in Karl Marx's Analysis of Capitalist Valorisation," MPRA Paper 48306, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 14 Jul 2013.

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