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Building a corporate network in a transition economy: the case of Slovenia

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  • Marko Pahor
  • Janez Prasnikar
  • Anuska Ferligoj

Abstract

Post-socialist countries in Central and Eastern Europe underwent a massive programme of privatisation in the 1990s. Corporate networks that emerged from the privatisation process are a reflection of a particular privatisation model chosen. In Slovenia, as in developed economies, financial institutions play a central role in the corporate network. But whereas in Western economies these are mainly banks, investment banks, pension funds and insurance companies, the central role in Slovenia was given to privatisation investment funds and state funds. Owners and regulators in transition countries face the difficult task of balancing between governance issues and benefits that arise from co-operation among companies.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Post-Communist Economies.

Volume (Year): 16 (2004)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 307-331

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Handle: RePEc:taf:pocoec:v:16:y:2004:i:3:p:307-331

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  1. Wendy Carlin & Steven Fries & Mark Schaffer & Paul Seabright, 2001. "Competition and Enterprise Performance in Transition Economies: Evidence from a Cross-country Survey," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 376, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  2. Dieter B”s & Phillipp Harms, 1995. "Mass Privatization, Management Control and Efficiency," Discussion Paper Serie A 475, University of Bonn, Germany.
  3. Alan Bevan & Saul Estrin & Mark E. Schaffer, 1999. "Determinants of Enterprise Performance during Transition," CERT Discussion Papers 9903, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
  4. Barbara G. Katz & Joel Owen, 1995. "Optimal Voucher Privatization Fund Bids When Bidding Affects Firm Performance," Working Papers 95-20, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. Buchen, Clemens, 2010. "Emerging economic systems in Central and Eastern Europe – a qualitative and quantitative assessment," EconStor Theses, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, number 37141.

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