Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Wage and employment rates in New Zealand from 1991 to 2001

Contents:

Author Info

  • Guyonne Kalb
  • Rosanna Scutella

Abstract

This paper examines the simultaneous determinants of employment and wage rates for people of working age in New Zealand. The determinants are as anticipated and similar to results in other countries. In addition to the effects of the usual variables (such as, education, age, family composition), it is found that unemployment affects the probability of employment negatively, but has no effect on wage rates, living with one's parents decreases the employment probability of singles but increases it for sole parents, and the change in the age of eligibility for the New Zealand Superannuation affects the employment decision, indicating that individuals reacted to incentives to participate at an older age.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00779950409544392
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal New Zealand Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 38 (2004)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 21-47

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:taf:nzecpp:v:38:y:2004:i:1:p:21-47

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RNZP20

Order Information:
Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/RNZP20

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Miller, Paul & Rummery, Sarah, 1991. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Australia: A Reassessment," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(56), pages 50-69, June.
  2. Greene, William H, 1981. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error: Comment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(3), pages 795-98, May.
  3. John Ermisch & Robert Wright, 1994. "Interpretation of negative sample selection effects in wage offer equations," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(11), pages 187-189.
  4. Guyonne Kalb & Rosanna Scutella & Hsein Kew, 2002. "Estimation of Wage Equations in Australia: Allowing for Censored Observations of Labour Supply," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2002n26, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  5. David C Mare & Peter Mawson & Jason Timmins, 2001. "Deprivation in New Zealand: Regional Patterns and Changes," Treasury Working Paper Series 01/09, New Zealand Treasury.
  6. John K Gibson & Grant M Scobie, 2001. "Household Saving Behaviour in New Zealand: A Cohort Analysis," Treasury Working Paper Series 01/18, New Zealand Treasury.
  7. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  8. Guyonne R. Kalb, 2000. "Labour Supply and Welfare Participation in Australian Two-Adult Households: Accounting for Involuntary Unemployment and the 'Cost' of Part-time Work," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers bp-35, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
  9. Maloney, Tim, 2000. "The impact of welfare reform on labour supply behaviour in New Zealand," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 427-448, July.
  10. Maloney, Tim, 2002. "Welfare Reform and Unemployment in New Zealand," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 69(274), pages 273-93, May.
  11. Creedy, J. & Duncan, A.S. & Harris, M.N. & Scutella, R., 2000. "Wage Function: Australian Estimates Using the Income Distribution Survey," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 761, The University of Melbourne.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Joseph Mercante & Penny Mok, 2014. "Estimation of wage equations for New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/09, New Zealand Treasury.
  2. Olivier Bargain, 2007. "On Modeling Household Labor Supply With Taxation," Working Papers 200711, School Of Economics, University College Dublin.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:nzecpp:v:38:y:2004:i:1:p:21-47. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.