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The trade impact of European Union agricultural preferences

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  • Maria Cipollina
  • Luca Salvatici

Abstract

We assess the impact on agricultural trade of European Union (EU) trade policies, using a gravity model based on disaggregated trade flows from 161 developing countries (DCs) to 15 EU member countries. We use a sample selection framework to account for potential selection bias of positive trade flows and provide an explicit measure for relative preference margins. From a policy perspective, our results debunk some of the most widespread criticisms of preferential policies: EU preferences matter and have a positive impact on DCs agricultural exports at both the extensive and intensive margins, although with significant differences across sectors.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Economic Policy Reform.

Volume (Year): 13 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 87-106

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jpolrf:v:13:y:2010:i:1:p:87-106

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Related research

Keywords: preferential trade policy; agricultural trade; gravity model; European trade policy;

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Cited by:
  1. Cooke, Edgar F. A., 2012. "Is the impact of AGOA heterogeneous?," MPRA Paper 43277, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Valentina Raimondi & Margherita Scoppola & Alessandro Olper, 2012. "Preference erosion and the developing countries exports to the EU: a dynamic panel gravity approach," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 148(4), pages 707-732, December.
  3. Shanping Yang & Inmaculada MartĂ­nez-Zarzoso, 2013. "A Panel Data Analysis of Trade Creation and Trade Diversion Effects: The case of ASEAN-China Free Trade Area (ACFTA)," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 224, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
  4. Maria Cipollina & Luca Salvatici & Luca De Benedictis & Claudio Vicarelli, 2013. "A note on dummies for policies in gravity models: a Montecarlo experiment," Departmental Working Papers of Economics - University 'Roma Tre' 0180, Department of Economics - University Roma Tre.
  5. Pierluigi Montalbano & Silvia Nenci & Emiliano Magrini, 2014. "Are the EU trade preferences really effective? A generalized propensity score evaluation of the Southern Mediterranea countries’ case in Agriculture and Fishery," Departmental Working Papers of Economics - University 'Roma Tre' 0188, Department of Economics - University Roma Tre.
  6. Cipollina, Maria & Laborde, David & Salvatici, Luca, 2013. "Do Preferential Trade Policies (Actually) Increase Exports? An analysis of EU trade policies," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150177, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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