Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Comparative Perspectives on Child Poverty: A review of poverty measures

Contents:

Author Info

  • Howard White
  • Jennifer Leavy
  • Andrew Masters

Abstract

Child poverty matters directly because children constitute a large share of the population, and indirectly for future individual and national well-being. Developed country measures of child poverty are dominated by income-poverty, although health and education are often included. But these are not necessarily the most direct measures of the things that matter to children. Moreover, a broader range of factors than material well-being matter for child development; family and community play an important role. The conclusion is that social and psychological variables are an important component of child welfare. Can such a conclusion be extended to developing countries? It might be thought not, since the dictates of a focus on absolute poverty imply concern with fundamentals such as malnutrition, illiteracy and premature death, and the things that cause these outcomes. But such a view is short-sighted. Child development concerns are at least as important in developing countries as developed ones, if less well understood. Hence, approaches to child welfare in developing countries (both measurement and policy) should also adopt a broad-based approach that embraces diverse aspects of the quality of a child' s life, including child rights.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1464988032000125755
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Volume (Year): 4 (2003)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 379-396

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:taf:jhudca:v:4:y:2003:i:3:p:379-396

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/CJHD20

Order Information:
Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/CJHD20

Related research

Keywords: Children; Poverty; Income-Poverty; Child Development; Family; Education; Health;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Laura Valadez Martinez, 2014. "Bridging the Gap: Conceptual and Empirical Dimensions of Child Wellbeing in Rural Mexico," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 116(2), pages 567-591, April.
  2. Jean-Francois Trani & Mario Biggeri & Vincenzo Mauro, 2013. "The Multidimensionality of Child Poverty: Evidence from Afghanistan," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 112(2), pages 391-416, June.
  3. Gina Crivello & Laura Camfield & Martin Woodhead, 2009. "How Can Children Tell Us About Their Wellbeing? Exploring the Potential of Participatory Research Approaches within Young Lives," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 90(1), pages 51-72, January.
  4. Roelen, Keetie & Gassmann, Franziska, 2008. "Measuring Child Poverty and Well-Being: a literature review," MPRA Paper 8981, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Gassmann, Franziska & Siegel, Melissa & Vanore, Michaella & Waidler, Jennifer, 2013. "The impact of migration on children left behind in Moldova," MERIT Working Papers 043, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  6. Jonathan Bradshaw & Leonardo Menchini & Yekaterina Chzhen & Gill Main & Bruno Martorano & Chris De Neubourg & UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2012. "Child Deprivation, Multidimensional Poverty and Monetary Poverty in Europe," Innocenti Working Papers inwopa657, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, revised 2012.
  7. Mario Biggeri & Jean-Francois Trani & Vincenzo Mauro, 2011. "Child Poverty Measurement: the Case of Afghanistan," Working Papers - Economics wp2011_18.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
  8. Keetie Roelen & Franziska Gassmann & Chris Neubourg, 2010. "Child Poverty in Vietnam: Providing Insights Using a Country-Specific and Multidimensional Model," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 98(1), pages 129-145, August.
  9. Geranda Notten & Keetie Roelen, 2010. "Cross-national comparison of monetary and multidimensional child poverty in the European Union: puzzling with the few pieces that the EUSILC provides," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 13510, BWPI, The University of Manchester.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:jhudca:v:4:y:2003:i:3:p:379-396. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.