Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Social Identity and the Formation of Health Insurance Networks

Contents:

Author Info

  • Joachim De Weerdt
  • Marcel Fafchamps

Abstract

In a panel survey of an informal insurance network in Tanzania we find none of the tell-tale signs that insurance transfers follow reciprocal risk sharing arrangements among self-interested individuals: insurance remittances do not occur through informal loans; transfers are not regressive; and they do not fall when shocks are repeated over time. The evidence of unreciprocated transfers occurring between kin is suggestive of risk sharing based on altruism or social norms .

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00220388.2010.527952
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Development Studies.

Volume (Year): 47 (2011)
Issue (Month): 8 (June)
Pages: 1152-1177

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:47:y:2011:i:8:p:1152-1177

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/FJDS20

Order Information:
Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/FJDS20

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Joshua Blumenstock & Nathan Eagle & Marcel Fafchamps, 2011. "Risk and Reciprocity Over the Mobile Phone Network: Evidence from Rwanda," CSAE Working Paper Series 2011-19, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  2. Abigail Barr & Mattea Stein, 2008. "Status and egalitarianism in traditional communities: An analysis of funeral attendance in six Zimbabwean villages," CSAE Working Paper Series 2008-26, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  3. Margherita Comola & Mariapia Mendola, 2013. "The Formation of Migrant Networks," Development Working Papers 353, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano.
  4. Johnson, Hillary & El Mekkaoui de Freitas, Najat, 2013. "Formal and Informal Social Protection in Iraq," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/13208, Paris Dauphine University.
  5. Renaud Bourlès & Yann Bramoullé, 2013. "Altruism in Networks," Working Papers halshs-00881451, HAL.
  6. Baird, Timothy D. & Gray, Clark L., 2014. "Livelihood Diversification and Shifting Social Networks of Exchange: A Social Network Transition?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 14-30.
  7. Lucia Corno, 2012. "Peer Effects on Criminal Behavior. Evidence from the homeless," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1204, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  8. De Weerdt, Joachim & Hirvonen, Kalle, 2013. "Risk sharing and internal migration," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6429, The World Bank.
  9. Jenny Trinitapoli & Sara Yeatman & Jasmine Fledderjohann, 2014. "Sibling support and the educational prospects of young adults in Malawi," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(19), pages 547-578, February.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:47:y:2011:i:8:p:1152-1177. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.