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Using Stated Preferences and Beliefs to Identify the Impact of Risk on Poor Households

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  • Ruth Vargas Hill

Abstract

Whilst the importance of uncertainty in shaping economic behaviour of poor households is widely acknowledged, empirically identifying the impact of risk is difficult. By using data on risk preferences and perceptions of risk collected through hypothetical questions in combination with more traditional measures of a household's ability to deal with risk, this article identifies the impact of risk on production decisions. It shows both that data on stated preferences and beliefs can be usefully utilised to explain household behaviour, and that risk has a significant impact on the production decisions of poor households.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00220380802553065
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Development Studies.

Volume (Year): 45 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 151-171

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:45:y:2009:i:2:p:151-171

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Cited by:
  1. Hardeweg, Bernd & Menkhoff, Lukas & Waibel, Hermann, 2011. "Experimentally-validated survey evidence on individual risk attitudes in rural Thailand," Diskussionspapiere der Wirtschaftswissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Leibniz Universität Hannover dp-464, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  2. Ruth Hill & Angelino Viceisza, 2012. "A field experiment on the impact of weather shocks and insurance on risky investment," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 341-371, June.
  3. Hill, Ruth Vargas & Viceisza, Angelino, 2010. "An experiment on the impact of weather shocks and insurance on risky investment," IFPRI discussion papers 974, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Nielsen, Thea & Zeller, Manfred, 2013. "The Impact of Shocks on Risk Preference Changes between Seasons for Smallholder Farmers in Vietnam," 53rd Annual Conference, Berlin, Germany, September 25-27, 2013 156101, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
  5. Hill, Ruth Vargas & Hoddinott, John & Kumar, Neha, 2011. "Adoption of weather index insurance: Learning from willingness to pay among a panel of households in rural Ethiopia," IFPRI discussion papers 1088, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Norton, Michael T. & Holthaus, Eric & Madajewicz, Malgosia & Osgood, Daniel E. & Peterson, Nicole & Gebremichael, Mengesha & Mullally, Conner & Teh, TseLing, 2011. "Investigating Demand for Weather Index Insurance: Experimental Evidence from Ethiopia," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 104022, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  7. Clarke, Danielle & Das, Narayan C. & de Nicola, Francesca & Hill, Ruth Vargas & Kumar, Neha & Mehta, Parendi, 2012. "The value of customized insurance for farmers in rural Bangladesh:," IFPRI discussion papers 1202, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. Delavande, Adeline & Gine, Xavier & McKenzie, David, 2009. "Measuring Subjective Expectations in Developing Countries: A Critical Review and New Evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4824, The World Bank.
  9. Ward, Patrick S. & Singh, Vartika, 2013. "Risk and Ambiguity Preferences and the Adoption of New Agricultural Technologies: Evidence from Field Experiments in Rural India," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150794, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  10. Tanguy Bernard & Stefan Dercon & Kate Orkin & Alemayehu Seyoum Taffesse, 2014. "The Future in Mind: Aspirations and Forward-Looking Behaviour in Rural Ethiopia," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-16, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  11. de Brauw, Alan & Eozenou, Patrick, 2011. "Measuring risk attitudes among Mozambican farmers:," HarvestPlus Working Papers 6, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  12. Hill, Ruth Vargas & Robles, Miguel, 2011. "Flexible insurance for heterogeneous farmers: Results from a small-scale pilot in Ethiopia," IFPRI discussion papers 1092, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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