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Political Violence and Excess Liquidity in Egypt

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  • David Fielding
  • Anja Shortland

Abstract

In this article we estimate a time-series model of excess liquidity in the Egyptian banking sector. While financial liberalisation and financial stability are found to have reduced excess liquidity, these effects have been offset by an increase in the number of violent political incidents arising from conflict between radical Islamic groups and the Egyptian state. The link between political events and financial outcomes provides a rationale for economic policy interventions by the international community in response to increases in political instability.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00220380500092580
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Development Studies.

Volume (Year): 41 (2005)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 542-557

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:41:y:2005:i:4:p:542-557

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References

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  1. Baltensperger, Ernst, 1980. "Alternative approaches to the theory of the banking firm," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 1-37, January.
  2. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Aizenman, Joshua & Hoffmaister, Alexander, 2000. "The credit crunch in East Asia : what can bank excess liquid assets tell us ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2483, The World Bank.
  3. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
  4. Alberto Alesina & Roberto Perotti, 1993. "Income Distribution, Political Instability, and Investment," NBER Working Papers 4486, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. repec:fth:coluec:625 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Kormendi, Roger C. & Meguire, Philip G., 1985. "Macroeconomic determinants of growth: Cross-country evidence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 141-163, September.
  7. Hansen, Bruce E., 1992. "Testing for parameter instability in linear models," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 517-533, August.
  8. David Fielding & Anja Shortland, 2002. "How does Political Violence Affect Currency Substitution? Evidence from Egypt," Discussion Papers in Economics 02/6, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  9. Fedderke, Johannes & Klitgaard, Robert, 1998. "Economic Growth and Social Indicators: An Exploratory Analysis," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 46(3), pages 455-89, April.
  10. David Fielding, 2003. "Modelling Political Instability and Economic Performance: Israeli Investment during the "Intifada"," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 70(277), pages 159-186, February.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Tarron Khemraj, 2007. "What does excess bank liquidity say about the loan market in Less Developed Countries?," Working Papers 60, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
  2. Primus, Keyra, 2013. "Excess Reserves, Monetary Policy and Financial Volatility," MPRA Paper 51670, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Tarron Khemraj, 2008. "Excess liquidity, oligopolistic loan markets and monetary policy in LDCs," Working Papers 64, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
  4. Tarron Khemraj, 2009. "Excess liquidity and the foreign currency constraint: the case of monetary management in Guyana," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(16), pages 2073-2084.
  5. Asongu, Simplice A, 2013. "Does Money Matter in Africa? New Empirics on Long- and Short-run Effects of Monetary Policy on Output and Prices," MPRA Paper 48494, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Asongu Simplice, 2013. "New Empirics of monetary policy dynamics: evidence from the CFA franc zones," Working Papers 13/016, African Governance and Development Institute..
  7. Anderson-Reid, Karen, 2011. "Excess reserves in Jamaican Commercial Banks: The implications for Monetary Policy," MPRA Paper 43663, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Khemraj, Tarron & Primus, Keyra, 2013. "Testing for the Credit Crunch in Trinidad and Tobago Using an Alternative Method," MPRA Paper 47372, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Khemraj, Tarron, 2010. "The simple analytics of oligopoly banking in developing economies," MPRA Paper 22266, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Pavla Vodová, 2014. "Determinants Of Commercial Bank Liquidity In Hungary," "e-Finanse", University of Information Technology and Management, Institute of Financial Research and Analysis, vol. 9(3), pages 64-71, January.

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