Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Privatisation and economic growth in developing countries

Contents:

Author Info

  • Paul Cook
  • Yuichiro Uchida
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This article re-examines the relation between privatisation and economic growth. Previous studies that have attempted to measure this relationship have concluded that privatisation has had a sizeable positive effect on economic growth. Our study uses data for 63 developing countries over the time period 1988-97. It uses the framework of an extreme-bounds analysis (EBA) to conduct a cross-country growth regression analysis. Our findings contradict earlier results, but reaffirm the view that effective competition and its regulation may need to accompany privatisation to make a positive impact on economic growth.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00220380312331293607
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Development Studies.

    Volume (Year): 39 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 6 ()
    Pages: 121-154

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:39:y:2003:i:6:p:121-154

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/FJDS20

    Order Information:
    Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/FJDS20

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Vatcharin Sirimaneetham, 2006. "Explaining policy volatility in developing countries," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 06/583, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    2. Mehmet Ulubasoglu & K. Peren Arin, 2005. "Leviathan Resists: The Endogenous Relationship Between Privatisation and Firm Performance," Economics Series 2005_17, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.
    3. Kilby, Christopher, 2004. "Aid and Regulation," Vassar College Department of Economics Working Paper Series 65, Vassar College Department of Economics.
    4. Sirimaneetham, Vatcharin & Temple, Jonathan, 2006. "Macroeconomic Policy and the Distribution of Growth Rates," CEPR Discussion Papers 5642, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Crivelli, Ernesto, 2013. "Fiscal impact of privatization revisited: The role of tax revenues in transition economies," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 217-232.
    6. Le, Hoang Cuong & Cabalu, Helen & Salim, Ruhul, 2014. "Winners and losers in Vietnam equitisation programs," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 172-184.
    7. Vatcharin Sirimaneetham, 2006. "What drives liberal policies in developing countries?," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 06/587, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    8. Abdella Abdou & Saeed Moshiri, 2009. "Privatization and capital formation in developing countries: an empirical analysis," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(5), pages 557-575.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:39:y:2003:i:6:p:121-154. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.