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Credit Programmes for the Poor and Seasonality in Rural Bangladesh

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Author Info

  • M. M. Pitt
  • S. R. Khandker

Abstract

This article examines the effect of group-based credit used to finance self-employment by landless households in Bangladesh on the seasonal pattern of household consumption and male and female labour supply. This credit can help smooth seasonal consumption by financing new productive activities whose income flows and time demands do not seasonally covary with the income generated by existing agricultural activities. The results, based upon 1991/92 survey data, strongly suggest that an important motivation for credit programme participation is the need to smooth the seasonal pattern of consumption and male labour supply. It is only the extent of lean season consumption poverty that selects household into these programmes. In addition, the largest female and male effects of credit on household consumption are during the lean season.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Development Studies.

Volume (Year): 39 (2002)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 1-24

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:39:y:2002:i:2:p:1-24

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Related research

Keywords: Bangladesh; group-based credit; household consumption; male and female labour supply; seasonality;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Johar, Meliyanni & Rammohan, Anu, 2006. "Demand for Microcredit by Indonesian women," Working Papers 2006-03, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
  2. Duvendack, Maren & Palmer-Jones, Richard, 2011. "High Noon for Microfinance Impact Evaluations: Re-investigating the Evidence from Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 27902, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Orso, Cristina, 2011. "Microcredit and poverty. An overview of the principal statistical methods used to measure the program net impacts," POLIS Working Papers 154, Institute of Public Policy and Public Choice - POLIS.
  4. Mark Pitt, 1999. "Civil Conflict: Ended Or Never Ending?," Working Papers 99-32, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  5. Alderman, Harold & Haque, Trina, 2006. "Countercyclical safety nets for the poor and vulnerable," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 372-383, August.
  6. Nidhiya Menon & Yana van der Meulen Rodgers, 2011. "How Access to Credit Affects Self-employment: Differences by Gender during India's Rural Banking Reform," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 48-69.
  7. Hasan, Mohammad Monirul, 2010. "Does credit improve the food consumption vulnerability of the extreme poor? - Empirical evidence from Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 28192, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Arun, Thankom Gopinath & Bendig, Mirko, 2010. "Risk Management among the Poor: The Case of Microfinancial Services," IZA Discussion Papers 5174, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Shonchoy, Abu S. & Kurosaki, Takashi, 2014. "Impact of seasonality-adjusted flexible microcredit on repayment and food consumption : experimental evidence from rural Bangladesh," IDE Discussion Papers 460, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  10. Wodon, Quentin & Beegle, Kathleen, 2006. "Labor Shortages Despite Underemployment? Seasonality in Time Use in Malawi," MPRA Paper 11083, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Duvendack, Maren & Palmer-Jones, Richard, 2011. "The microfinance of reproduction and the reproduction of microfinance: understanding the connections between microfinance, empowerment, contraception and fertility in Bangladesh in the 1990s," MPRA Paper 32384, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Islam, Asadul & Maitra, Pushkar, 2012. "Health shocks and consumption smoothing in rural households: Does microcredit have a role to play?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 232-243.
  13. Nidhiya Menon, 2006. "Non-linearities in returns to participation in Grameen Bank programs," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(8), pages 1379-1400.
  14. Operations Evaluation Department, 2005. "Maintaining Momentum to 2015 : An Impact Evaluation of Interventions to Improve Maternal and Child Health and Nutrition in Bangladesh," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7372, October.
  15. Khandker, Shahidur R., 2012. "Seasonality of income and poverty in Bangladesh," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 244-256.
  16. Nidhiya Menon, 2006. "Long-term benefits of membership in microfinance programmes," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 571-594.
  17. Howard White & Edoardo Masset & Nina Blondal & Hugh Waddington, 2005. "Maintaining Momentum to 2015? An impact evaluation of interventions to improve maternal and child health and nutrition in Bangladesh," Development and Comp Systems 0510004, EconWPA.
  18. Roodman, David & Morduch, Jonathan, 2013. "The Impact of Microcredit on the Poor in Bangladesh: Revisiting the Evidence," CEI Working Paper Series 2013-02, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

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