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Village politics: Heterogeneity, leadership and collective action

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  • Trond Vedeld
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    Abstract

    When comparing stratified Fulani village societies, little direct relationship between the degree of heterogeneity and the success in collective action was found, except when heterogeneity among leadership and elite groups was compared. Small size and homogeneous groups do not seem to be general preconditions for stronger ability to perform collectively. First, it was found that homogeneity among elite groups enhanced capacity for collective action. Second, it was when heterogeneity in economic interests between elite groups intensified and coincided with other dimensions of heterogeneity that collective action became difficult to achieve, such as heterogeneity in economic wealth, access to land and common-pool resources, and agreement over authority of the leadership. Third, collective action was enhanced by political elites and leaders being a bit better endowed and a bit wealthier than the average community members, but not when their assets were mobilised against the economic interests and sense of fairness of other social groups. Fourth, the coordination power of the leadership related to the management of common-pool resources was undermined when leadership had extensive recourse to state officials external to the village community, underscoring the importance of autonomy.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Development Studies.

    Volume (Year): 36 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 5 ()
    Pages: 105-134

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:36:y:2000:i:5:p:105-134

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    Cited by:
    1. Roncoli, Carla & Jost, Christine & Perez, Carlos & Moore, Keith & Ballo, Adama & Cisse, Salmana & Ouattara, Karim, 2007. "Carbon sequestration from common property resources: Lessons from community-based sustainable pasture management in north-central Mali," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 97-109, April.
    2. Beard, Victoria A., 2007. "Household Contributions to Community Development in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 607-625, April.
    3. Madrigal, Róger & Alpízar, Francisco & Schlüter, Achim, 2011. "Determinants of Performance of Community-Based Drinking Water Organizations," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 1663-1675, September.
    4. Bastiaensen, Johan & Herdt, Tom De & D'Exelle, Ben, 2005. "Poverty reduction as a local institutional process," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 979-993, June.
    5. Tai, Hsing-Sheng, 2007. "Development Through Conservation: An Institutional Analysis of Indigenous Community-Based Conservation in Taiwan," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 1186-1203, July.
    6. repec:snd:wpaper:75 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Béné, Christophe & Belal, Emma & Baba, Malloum Ousman & Ovie, Solomon & Raji, Aminu & Malasha, Isaac & Njaya, Friday & Na Andi, Mamane & Russell, Aaron & Neiland, Arthur, 2009. "Power Struggle, Dispute and Alliance Over Local Resources: Analyzing 'Democratic' Decentralization of Natural Resources through the Lenses of Africa Inland Fisheries," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 1935-1950, December.
    8. Naidu, Sirisha C., 2009. "Heterogeneity and Collective Management: Evidence from Common Forests in Himachal Pradesh, India," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 676-686, March.
    9. Rivayani Darmawan & Stephan Klasen, 2013. "Elite Capture in Urban Development: Evidence from Indonesia," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 145, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    10. Bene, Christophe, 2003. "When Fishery Rhymes with Poverty: A First Step Beyond the Old Paradigm on Poverty in Small-Scale Fisheries," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 949-975, June.
    11. repec:snd:wpaper:73 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Matta, Jagannadha R. & Alavalapati, Janaki R.R., 2006. "Perceptions of collective action and its success in community based natural resource management: An empirical analysis," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 274-284, December.
    13. Ruttan, Lore M., 2008. "Economic Heterogeneity and the Commons: Effects on Collective Action and Collective Goods Provisioning," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 969-985, May.

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