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An Examination of the Government Spending and Economic Growth Nexus for Malaysia Using the Leveraged Bootstrap Simulation Approach

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  • Chor Foon Tang

Abstract

The main objective of this study is to re-examine the government spending-growth nexus for Malaysia from the perspective of disaggregated government spending. The yearly data from 1960 to 2007 is used in this study. This study applied the bounds testing for co-integration and the leveraged bootstrap simulation approaches to examine the relationship between three different categories of government spending and national income in Malaysia. It is found that government spending on education and defence are co-integrated with national income. Nevertheless, there is no evidence of co-integrating relation between government spending on health and national income. The MWALD causality test shows strong evidence of unidirectional causal relationship running from national income to the three major government spending in Malaysia. However, bilateral causality evident exists only between government spending on health and national income.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/12265080902903266
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Global Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 38 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 215-227

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Handle: RePEc:taf:glecrv:v:38:y:2009:i:2:p:215-227

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Related research

Keywords: Government spending; growth; MWALD; leveraged bootstrap;

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Cited by:
  1. Nicholas Apergis & Puja Padhi, 2013. "Health expenses and economic growth: convergence dynamics across the Indian States," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 261-277, December.
  2. Tang, Chor Foon, 2010. "The determinants of health expenditure in Malaysia: A time series analysis," MPRA Paper 24356, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Tang, Chor Foon, 2011. "Multivariate Granger Causality and the Dynamic Relationship between Health Care Spending, Income and Relative Price of Health Care in Malaysia," Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 52(2), pages 199-214, December.
  4. Chaido Dritsaki & Melina Dritsaki, 2010. "Government Expenditure and National Income: Causality Tests for Twelve New Members of E.E," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 13(38), pages 67-89, December.
  5. Tang, Chor Foon, 2010. "Revisiting the health-income nexus in Malaysia: ARDL cointegration and Rao's F-test for causality," MPRA Paper 27287, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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