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Clean Energy Technology and the Role of Non-Carbon Price-Based Policy: An Evolutionary Economics Perspective

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  • Nicholas Howarth
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    Abstract

    Much academic attention has been paid to the role of carbon pricing in developing a market-led response to low-carbon energy innovation. Taking an evolutionary economics perspective, this paper makes the case as to why price mechanisms alone are insufficient to support new energy technologies coming to market. In doing so, we set out the unique investment barriers in the clean energy space. For guidance on possible approaches to non-carbon price-based policies that seek to tackle these barriers, we turn to case studies from Asia, a region which has experienced a strong uptake in climate policy in recent years.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/09654313.2012.667930
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal European Planning Studies.

    Volume (Year): 20 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 5 (October)
    Pages: 871-891

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:eurpls:v:20:y:2011:i:5:p:871-891

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    Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/CEPS20

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