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Derivatives usage in UK non-financial listed companies

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  • Chris Mallin
  • Kean Ow-Yong
  • Martin Reynolds
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    Abstract

    In this paper, the authors present the results of a 1997 survey of derivative used by some 231 UK non-financial companies. The questionnaire instrument used in this research is based upon the postal survey methodology of Bodnar et al. (1995). A glossary was attached to the questionnaire survey to enable consistency in defining terminology used. A direct comparison between US and UK findings was undertaken together with an analysis of results from other published surveys conducted in the last four years. We find broadly similar trends in the use of derivatives. The results of our research show that derivatives usage to hedge financial price risk is well established amongst larger UK companies. Our findings support the size effect phenomena reported in other empirical studies. The primary objective cited in using derivatives was to manage fluctuations in accounting earnings, a focus that is inconsistent with the theoretical view of paying attention to cash flow benefits of hedging. The predominant issues of concern to UK inancial directors are the lack of evaluation of risk of proposed derivative transactions and the level of transaction costs incurred. This contrasts with the greater concerns of credit risk and market risk raised by their US counterparts in Bodnar's study. A possible explanation for these concerns could be the impact of the currency crisis happening in Asia especially for firms that are exposed to the affected currencies. It also suggests a lower level of sophistication and liquidity in UK derivatives market. The value of developing a basis for benchmarking good management practice in the use of derivatives to manage financial price risk represents an important area of research. Such a framework is of relevance to the demand and supply side of the derivatives market and to Government policy makers.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal The European Journal of Finance.

    Volume (Year): 7 (2001)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 63-91

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:eurjfi:v:7:y:2001:i:1:p:63-91

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    Related research

    Keywords: Derivatives Risk Management;

    References

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    1. Mian, Shehzad L., 1996. "Evidence on Corporate Hedging Policy," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 31(03), pages 419-439, September.
    2. Gordon M. Bodnar & Gregory S. Hayt & Richard C. Marston, 1996. "1995 Wharton Survey of Derivatives Usage by US Non-Financial Firms," Financial Management, Financial Management Association, vol. 25(4), Winter.
    3. Geczy, Christopher & Minton, Bernadette A & Schrand, Catherine, 1997. " Why Firms Use Currency Derivatives," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 52(4), pages 1323-54, September.
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    Cited by:
    1. Bodnar, G.M. & Jong, A. de & Macrae, V., 2001. "The Impact of Institutional Differences on Derivatives Usage: A Comparative Study of US and Dutch Firms," Discussion Paper 2001-62, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    2. Aabo, Tom & Høg, Esben & Kuhn, Jochen, 2010. "Integrated foreign exchange risk management: The role of import in medium-sized manufacturing firms," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 20(4-5), pages 235-250, December.
    3. Spano, Marcello, 2004. "Determinants of hedging and its effects on investment and debt," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 175-197, January.
    4. Bartram, Söhnke M., 2004. "The Use of Options in Corporate Risk Management," MPRA Paper 6663, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Bodnar, G.M. & de Jong, A. & Macrae, V., 2001. "The Impact of Institutional Differences on Derivatives Usage," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2001-89-F&A, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    6. Marcello SPANO', 2003. "Productivity shocks and hedging: theory and evidence," Departmental Working Papers 2003-26, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
    7. Hagelin, Niclas & Pramborg, Bengt, 2006. "Empirical evidence concerning incentives to hedge transaction and translation exposures," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 142-159, April.
    8. Hoa Nguyen & Robert Faff, 2007. "Are Financial Derivates Really Value Enhancing? Australian Evidence," Accounting, Finance, Financial Planning and Insurance Series 2007_14, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.

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