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The Demand for Post-Compulsory Education in Four European Countries

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  • Steven McIntosh

Abstract

This study seeks to explain changes in the post-compulsory education participation rates of 16- and 18-year-old people in England and Wales, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden. The results suggest that the key explanatory variable is the increase in prior academic attainment before the end of compulsory schooling. While this is the case particularly for females, males are also influenced by the returns available to offering a higher level of education, and the level of real income available to 'spend' on education. The level of youth unemployment seems to play only a small part in the decision of whether to remain in education.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09645290125224
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Education Economics.

Volume (Year): 9 (2001)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 69-90

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Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:9:y:2001:i:1:p:69-90

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  1. Glyn, Andrew, 1995. "Unemployment and inequality," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economic Change and Employment FS I 95-303, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
  2. Granger, C. W. J. & Newbold, P., 1974. "Spurious regressions in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 111-120, July.
  3. Pissarides, Christopher A, 1981. "Staying-on at School in England and Wales," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 48(192), pages 345-63, November.
  4. Dickey, David A & Fuller, Wayne A, 1981. "Likelihood Ratio Statistics for Autoregressive Time Series with a Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 1057-72, June.
  5. Glyn, Andrew, 1995. "The Assessment: Unemployment and Inequality," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 1-25, Spring.
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Cited by:
  1. Canton, Erik & de Jong, Frank, 2005. "The demand for higher education in The Netherlands, 1950-1999," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 651-663, December.
  2. Riphahn, Regina T., 1999. "Residential Location and Youth Unemployment: The Economic Geography of School-To-Work Transitions," IZA Discussion Papers 99, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Peter Dolton & Li Lin, 2011. "From Grants to Loans and Fees: The Demand for Post-Compulsory Education in England and Wales from 1955 to 2008," CEE Discussion Papers 0127, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  4. Regina T. Riphahn, 2010. "Residential Location and Youth Unemployment: The Economic Geography of School-To-Work," Working Papers id:2648, eSocialSciences.
  5. Pamela Lenton, 2006. "Where do I go and what should I do? Routes through further education," Working Papers 2006014, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2006.

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