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The Accumulation of Human Capital Over Time and its Impact on Salary Growth in China

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  • Zeyun Liu
  • Jin Xiao
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    Abstract

    This study compares the growth in salaries across three spatial regions in China during the period 1993-1998, when economic reforms were implemented nationwide. Our study compares the impact of three forms of education and training on salary growth, namely pre-job formal schooling, on-the-job-training provided by employers, and adult education paid for by the employees themselves. We used a three-level hierarchical linear model to partition variance among individual, firm, and regional characteristics. The data were drawn from a 1998 survey of 16 485 employees from 365 firms in six provinces (two provinces in the eastern part of the country, two in the central part, and two in the western part). We found that: (1) regional disparities have a paramount impact on differences in salary; (2) individual characteristics defined by firm as well as firm characteristics are significantly related to salary decisions; (3) returns to formal schooling increase significantly in more market-based regions; and (4) employees also benefit by receiving on-the-job-training and by participating in adult education programs outside their firm.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09645290600622913
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Education Economics.

    Volume (Year): 14 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 155-180

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:14:y:2006:i:2:p:155-180

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    Related research

    Keywords: Human capital; salary; hierarchical linear model; China;

    References

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    1. Meng, Xin, 1998. "Male-female wage determination and gender wage discrimination in China's rural industrial sector," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 67-89, March.
    2. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-46, September.
    3. Spence, A Michael, 1973. "Job Market Signaling," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 87(3), pages 355-74, August.
    4. Elchanan Cohn & John Addison, 1998. "The Economic Returns to Lifelong Learning in OECD Countries," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 253-307.
    5. Levin, Henry M. & Kelley, Carolyn, 1994. "Can education do it alone?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 97-108, June.
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