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Impact of Preferences, Curriculum, and Learning Strategies on Academic Success

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  • Manuchehr Irandoust
  • Niklas Karlsson
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    Abstract

    This paper attempts to examine a few factors characterizing preferences, curriculum, and learning strategies that influence academic success and failure. On the basis of a proportional odds model, our findings reveal that good performance by the student depends on: (i) the time spent on physical training, (ii) the subjects chosen at high school, and (iii) the study of previously given examinations as a learning strategy. The results do not support the contention that the average score at high school, preparation by reading course literature prior to lectures, and time spent studying are important variables with regard to academic achievement. Our results suggest three policy implications: (i) to encourage students to engage in some kind of physical training, (ii) to guide students regarding how they should use the previously given examinations, and (iii) to require that students do course-work on the mathematics of economics.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09645290110110191
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Education Economics.

    Volume (Year): 10 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 41-48

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:10:y:2002:i:1:p:41-48

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    1. David Romer, 1993. "Do Students Go to Class? Should They?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 167-174, Summer.
    2. Jean Luc De Meulemeester & Denis Rochat, 1995. "Impact of individual characteristics and sociocultural environment on academic success," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/1595, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    3. Durden, Garey C & Ellis, Larry V, 1995. "The Effects of Attendance on Student Learning in Principles of Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 343-46, May.
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    Cited by:
    1. Gevrek, Deniz & Gevrek, Z. Eylem, 2010. "Nepotism, incentives and the academic success of college students," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 581-591, June.

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