Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

A Study on the Indian Information Sector: An Experiment with Input-Output Techniques

Contents:

Author Info

  • Sikhanwita Roy
  • Tuhin Das
  • Debesh Chakraborty

Abstract

It is widely recognized that rapid changes in information technology (IT) are bringing about major structural changes in the economies of the world. Information flexibility, product quality and fast response are the key factors for global competition and IT plays a critical role in these areas. Policy-makers in industrialized and developing countries view IT as a critical infrastructure to enhance their access to global knowledge, markets and capital. These views--of IT as infrastructure and as core capability for development--resonate with India's aspirations to modernize its infrastructure, transform its industry and join the global economy. Realizing the huge potential of the Indian IT industry, we make an attempt in this paper to study the extent of informatization in the Indian economy during the period 1983-84 to 1989-90 and try to identify the information intensive sectors. This paper also studies the sources of growth of the information sectors of India during 1983-84 to 1989-90 with the help of a structural decomposition analysis (SDA).

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09535310220140924
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Economic Systems Research.

Volume (Year): 14 (2002)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 107-129

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:14:y:2002:i:2:p:107-129

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/CESR20

Order Information:
Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/CESR20

Related research

Keywords: Information; Sector; Causative; Matrix; Information; Intensity; Structural; Decomposition;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Kevin J. Stiroh & Dale W. Jorgenson, 1999. "Information Technology and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 109-115, May.
  2. Shuntaro Shishido & Makoto Nobukuni & Kazumi Kawamura & Takahiro Akita & Shunichi Furukawa, 2000. "An International Comparison of Leontief Input-Output Coefficients and its Application to Structural Growth Patterns," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 45-64.
  3. Rolando Alcala & Gabrielle Antille & Emilio Fontela, 1999. "Technical Change in the Private Consumption Converter," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(4), pages 389-400.
  4. Mark De Haan, 2001. "A Structural Decomposition Analysis of Pollution in the Netherlands," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 181-196.
  5. Jack E. Triplett, 1999. "The Solow productivity paradox: what do computers do to productivity?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 32(2), pages 309-334, April.
  6. Berndt, Ernst R. & Morrison, Catherine J., 1995. "High-tech capital formation and economic performance in U.S. manufacturing industries An exploratory analysis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 9-43, January.
  7. Karunaratne, Neil Dias, 1986. " An Input-Output Approach to the Measurement of the Information Economy," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 87-103.
  8. Bregman, Arie & Fuss, Melvyn & Regev, Haim, 1991. "High tech and productivity: Evidence from Israeli industrial firms," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 1199-1221, August.
  9. Henrik Jacobsen, 2000. "Energy Demand, Structural Change and Trade: A Decomposition Analysis of the Danish Manufacturing Industry," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 319-343.
  10. Erik Dietzenbacher & Bart Los, 2000. "Structural Decomposition Analyses with Dependent Determinants," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 497-514.
  11. Axel During & Hermann Schnabel, 2000. "Imputed Interindustry Technology Flows - A Comparative SMFA Analysis," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 363-375.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Rohman, Ibrahim Kholilul & Bohlin, Erik, 2010. "On the ICT Economy in the European Countries: Investigating the Contribution of the ICT Sectors Using the Input-Output Model," 21st European Regional ITS Conference, Copenhagen 2010: Telecommunications at new crossroads - Changing value configurations, user roles, and regulation 29, International Telecommunications Society (ITS).
  2. Rita Bhowmik, 2003. "Service Intensities in the Indian Economy: 1968/9-1993/4," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4), pages 427-437.
  3. Andrea BONFIGLIO, 2005. "Sector Potentiality and Sources of Growth. An Analysis of Structural Changes in Italy in the Nineties," Working Papers 237, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
  4. Toh Mun Heng & Shandre M. Thangavelu, 2006. "Singapore Information Sector: A Study Using Input-Output Table," SCAPE Policy Research Working Paper Series 0615, National University of Singapore, Department of Economics, SCAPE.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:14:y:2002:i:2:p:107-129. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.