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Macro-economic and Sectoral Effects of Carbon Taxes: A General Equilibrium Analysis for China

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  • Zhongxiang Zhang

Abstract

This paper analyzes the macro-economic and sectoral effects of carbon taxes imposed to achieve predefined carbon dioxide (CO2) emission targets for China, by using a dynamic computable general equilibrium model of the Chinese economy. Following a brief introduction of the model, the baseline scenario for the Chinese economy until 2010 is developed under a set of assumptions about the exogenous variables. Next, the paper analyzes the economic implications of two less restrictive scenarios under which China's CO2 emissions in 2010 are cut by 20% and 30%, respectively, relative to the baseline, assuming that carbon tax revenues are retained by the government. Then, the efficiency improvements are computed for four indirect tax-offset scenarios relative to the two tax-retention scenarios already considered. The paper ends with some remarks on constructing a social accounting matrix for China and suggestions for further work to enrich the policy relevance of this study.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Economic Systems Research.

Volume (Year): 10 (1998)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 135-159

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Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:10:y:1998:i:2:p:135-159

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Related research

Keywords: Carbon dioxide emissions; carbon tax; China; computable general equilib-rium model;

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Cited by:
  1. Lecca, Patrizio & Swales, J Kim & Turner, Karen, 2010. "An investigation of issues relating to where energy should enter the production function," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2010-18, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  2. Rueda-Cantuche, José M. & Amores, Antonio F., 2010. "Consistent and unbiased carbon dioxide emission multipliers: Performance of Danish emission reductions via external trade," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(5), pages 988-998, March.
  3. Christian Lutz, 2000. "NO x Emissions and the Use of Advanced Pollution Abatement Techniques in West Germany," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 305-318.
  4. Sam Meng & Mahinda Siriwardana & Judith McNeill, 2013. "The Environmental and Economic Impact of the Carbon Tax in Australia," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 54(3), pages 313-332, March.
  5. Xu, Zhongmin & Cheng, Guodong & Chen, Dongjin & Templet, Paul H., 2002. "Economic diversity, development capacity and sustainable development of China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 369-378, March.
  6. Jorge Alarcon & Jan Van Heemst & Niek De Jong, 2000. "Extending the SAM with Social and Environmental Indicators: An Application to Bolivia," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 473-496.

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