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Defense Spending Promotes Aggregate Output in the United States--Evidence from Cointegration Analysis

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  • H. Sonmez Atesoglu
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    Abstract

    This paper provides new evidence on the question of the effects of defense spending on aggregate output in the United States. Earlier studies of this basic issue relied on traditional econometric techniques and the neoclassical production function theory. In this paper, recently developed cointegration methodology and modeling that is inspired by new macroeconomic theory is employed. The results from earlier studies concerning the effects of defense spending are mixed. The findings presented in this paper reveal that there is a quantitatively important and positive relation between defense spending and aggregate output in the United States.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10242690210963
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Defence and Peace Economics.

    Volume (Year): 13 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 55-60

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:13:y:2002:i:1:p:55-60

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    Related research

    Keywords: Defense Spending; Aggregate Output; Cointegration Analysis;

    References

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    1. David H. Romer, 2000. "Keynesian Macroeconomics without the LM Curve," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 149-169, Spring.
    2. Engle, Robert F & Granger, Clive W J, 1987. "Co-integration and Error Correction: Representation, Estimation, and Testing," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 251-76, March.
    3. Johansen, Soren, 1991. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing of Cointegration Vectors in Gaussian Vector Autoregressive Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(6), pages 1551-80, November.
    4. Granger, Clive W J, 1997. "On Modelling the Long Run in Applied Economics," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(440), pages 169-77, January.
    5. John B. Taylor, 2000. "Teaching Modern Macroeconomics at the Principles Level," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 90-94, May.
    6. Gonzalo, Jesus, 1994. "Five alternative methods of estimating long-run equilibrium relationships," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 203-233.
    7. Feder, Gershon, 1983. "On exports and economic growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1-2), pages 59-73.
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    Cited by:
    1. Luca Pieroni & Giorgio d'Agostino & Marco Lorusso, 2008. "Can We Declare Military Keynesianism Dead?," Working Papers 0804, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    2. Paul Dunne & Eftychia Nikolaidou, 2005. "Military Spending and Economic Growth in Greece, Portugal and Spain," Working Papers 0510, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    3. Shahbaz Muhammad & Carlos Leitao Nuno & Salah Uddin Ghazi & Mohamed Arouri & Frederic Teulon, 2014. "Should Portuguese Economy Invest in Defense Spending? A Revisit," Working Papers 2014-380, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
    4. Kimbambu Tsasa Vangu, Jean - Paul, 2012. "Analyse de la Relation Guerres Civiles et Croissance Économique
      [Civil Wars and Economic Growth in DRC]
      ," MPRA Paper 42424, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 05 Feb 2012.
    5. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Afza, Talat & Shabbir, Shahbaz Muhammad, 2011. "Does defence spending impede economic growth? cointegration and causality analysis for Pakistan," MPRA Paper 30887, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 27 Mar 2011.
    6. McDonald Bruce D & Eger Robert J, 2010. "The Defense-Growth Relationship: An Economic Investigation into Post-Soviet States," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 1-28, September.
    7. Tiwari, Aviral & Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2011. "Does Defence Spending Stimulate Economic Growth in India?," MPRA Paper 30880, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 18 Apr 2011.
    8. Ageli, Mohammed Moosa & Zaidan, Shatha Mousa, 2012. "Consequential Effects of Defence Expenditure on Economic Growth of Saudi Arabia: 1970-2012," MPRA Paper 46590, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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