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Military spending and economic growth in South Africa

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Author Info

  • Peter Batchelor
  • J. Paul Dunne
  • David Saal

Abstract

This paper undertakes an empirical analysis of the economic effects of military spending on the South African economy. It estimates a neo-classical model common in the literature at the level of the macroeconomy and at the level of the manufacturing sector. An attempt is made to improve upon the model by allowing the data to determine the dynamic structure of the model through an ARDL procedure. No significant impact of military spending is found in aggregate, but there is a significant negative impact for the manufacturing sector. This suggests that the cuts in domestic military procurement that have occurred since 1989 could lead to improved economic performance in South Africa through their impact on the manufacturing sector.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10430710008404966
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Defence and Peace Economics.

Volume (Year): 11 (2000)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 553-571

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Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:11:y:2000:i:4:p:553-571

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Related research

Keywords: Military spending; Growth; South Africa; Externalities;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Alexamder, W.R. & Hansen, P. Author-Emai, 2004. "A Criritique of the Multi-Sector Model of the Effects of Military Spending on Economic Growth," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 4(2).
  2. Julide Yildirim & Selami Sezgin & Nadir Ocal, 2005. "Military Expenditure And Economic Growth In Middle Eastern Countries: A Dynamic Panel Data Analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 283-295.
  3. Muhammad, Shahbaz & Nuno, Carlos Leitão & Ghazi, Salah Uddin, 2012. "Should Portuguese Economy Invest in Defense Spending? A Revisit," MPRA Paper 42289, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 26 Oct 2012.
  4. J Paul Dunne, 2011. "Military Keynesianism: An Assessment," Working Papers 1106, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  5. J Paul Dunne, Eftychia Nikolaidou, 2005. "Military Spending and Economic Growth in Greece, Portugal and Spain," Frontiers in Finance and Economics, SKEMA Business School, vol. 2(1), pages 1-17, June.
  6. Yousif Khalifa Al-Yousif, 2002. "Defense Spending and Economic Growth: Some Empirical Evidence from the Arab Gulf Region," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 187-197.
  7. Glass, Anthony, 2009. "Government expenditure on public order and safety, economic growth and private investment: Empirical evidence from the United States," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 29-37, March.
  8. Giorgio d'Agostino & Luca Pieroni & J Paul Dunne, 2010. "Assessing the Effects of Military Expenditure on Growth," Working Papers 1012, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  9. J Paul Dunne & Ron Smith & Dirk Willenbockel, 2004. "Models of Military Expenditure and Growth: A Critical Review," Working Papers 0408, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  10. Tiwari, Aviral & Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2011. "Does Defence Spending Stimulate Economic Growth in India?," MPRA Paper 30880, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 18 Apr 2011.
  11. Muhammad Shahbaz & Talat Afza & Muhammad Shahbaz Shabbir, 2013. "Does Defence Spending Impede Economic Growth? Cointegration And Causality Analysis For Pakistan," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 105-120, April.
  12. Farzanegan, Mohammad Reza, 2011. "Military spending and economic growth: the case of Iran," MPRA Paper 35498, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Christos Kollias & Charis Naxakisb & Leonidas Zarangasb, 2004. "Defence Spending and Growth in Cyprus: A Causal Analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 299-307.
  14. Muhammad, Shahbaz & Reza, Sherafatian-Jahromi & Muhammad, Nasir Malik, 2012. "Linkages between Defence Spending and Income Inequality in Iran," MPRA Paper 41983, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 14 Oct 2012.
  15. Kimbambu Tsasa Vangu, Jean - Paul, 2012. "Analyse de la Relation Guerres Civiles et Croissance Économique
    [Civil Wars and Economic Growth in DRC]
    ," MPRA Paper 42424, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 05 Feb 2012.

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