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Growth effects of fiscal policies: an application of robust modified M-estimator

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  • C. Colombier

Abstract

In the field of economics only nonhigh-quality data is usually available, which can cause the widely used least square estimators (LSE) to be biased and inefficient. Therefore, the present study introduces the robust modified M-estimator (MME) proposed by Yohai et al. (1991). In the case of growth regressions with fiscal variables it can be shown that LSE is biased and inefficient, whereas MME is not. The robust regressions ascertain a stable positive growth effect of public infrastructure and education. Moreover, this study shows that government size has not been detrimental to growth for OECD countries in the past. No growth effects of taxation have been found so that endogenous growth theory is not corroborated in this regard. Consequently, fiscal policies aiming at promoting growth should focus on infrastructure and education.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 41 (2009)
Issue (Month): 7 ()
Pages: 899-912

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:7:p:899-912

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  1. Jonathan Temple, 1999. "The New Growth Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 112-156, March.
  2. Zaman, Asad & Rousseeuw, Peter J. & Orhan, Mehmet, 2001. "Econometric applications of high-breakdown robust regression techniques," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 1-8, April.
  3. Fölster, Stefan & Henrekson, Magnus, 1998. "Growth Effects of Government Expenditure and Taxation in Rich Countries," Working Paper Series 503, Research Institute of Industrial Economics, revised 20 Jun 2000.
  4. Agell, Jonas & Ohlsson, Henry & Thoursie, Peter Skogman, 2006. "Growth effects of government expenditure and taxation in rich countries: A comment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 211-218, January.
  5. Michael Bleaney & Norman Gemmell & Richard Kneller, 2001. "Testing the endogenous growth model: public expenditure, taxation, and growth over the long run," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(1), pages 36-57, February.
  6. Nijkamp, Peter & Poot, Jacques, 2004. "Meta-analysis of the effect of fiscal policies on long-run growth," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 91-124, March.
  7. Temple, Jonathan, 2000. "Growth Regressions and What the Textbooks Don't Tell You," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 181-205, July.
  8. Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1997. "I just ran four million regressions," Economics Working Papers 201, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  9. Carsten Colombier & Michael Pickhardt, 2005. "A Note on Public Input Specifications," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 13-18, March.
  10. Robert J. Barro & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1990. "Public Finance in Models of Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 3362, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Kneller, Richard & Bleaney, Michael F. & Gemmell, Norman, 1999. "Fiscal policy and growth: evidence from OECD countries," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 171-190, November.
  12. Andrea Bassanini & Stefano Scarpetta & Philip Hemmings, 2001. "Economic Growth: The Role of Policies and Institutions: Panel Data. Evidence from OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 283, OECD Publishing.
  13. Howard Pack, 1994. "Endogenous Growth Theory: Intellectual Appeal and Empirical Shortcomings," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 55-72, Winter.
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Cited by:
  1. Andreas Bergh & Magnus Henrekson, 2011. "Government Size And Growth: A Survey And Interpretation Of The Evidence," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(5), pages 872-897, December.
  2. Norman Gemmell & Joey Au, 2013. "Do Smaller Governments Raise the Level or Growth of Output? A Review of Recent Evidence," Review of Economics, Lucius & Lucius, vol. 64(2), pages 85-116.
  3. anwar, saba & munir, kashif, 2013. "Size of the Government, Quality of Institutions and Growth in SAARC Countries," MPRA Paper 49524, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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