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The Granger-causality between health care expenditure and output: a panel data approach

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  • Erkan Erdil
  • I. Hakan Yetkiner

Abstract

This study investigates the Granger-causality relationship between real per capita GDP and real per capita health care expenditure by employing a large macro panel data set with a VAR representation. The findings verify that the dominant type of Granger-causality is bidirectional. In instances that we found one-way causality, the pattern is not homogenous: Our analyses show that one-way causality generally runs from income to health in low- and middle-income countries whereas the reverse holds for high-income countries. Accordingly, care must be paid in defining the dependent and independent variables when specifying the determinants of health care expenditure.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036840601019083
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 41 (2009)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 511-518

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:4:p:511-518

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Jochen Hartwig, 2008. "Has health capital formation cured ‘Baumol’s Disease’? – Panel Granger causality evidence for OECD countries," KOF Working papers 08-206, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  2. Unal Tongur & Adem Yavuz Elveren, 2013. "Deunionization and Pay Inequality in OECD Countries: A Panel Granger Causality Approach," ERC Working Papers 1306, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised May 2013.
  3. Abdel Aal Mahmoud, Ashraf, 2010. "FDI and Local Financial Market Development:A Granger Causality Test Using Panel Data," MPRA Paper 24654, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Abdel Aal Mahmoud, Ashraf, 2010. "FDI, local Financial Markets, employment and poverty alleviation," MPRA Paper 23608, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jul 2010.
  5. Hannu Tervo, 2011. "Cities, hinterlands and agglomeration shadows: spatial developments in Finland over 1880-2004," ERSA conference papers ersa10p147, European Regional Science Association.
  6. Shu-Chen Chang & Teng-Yu Chang, 2012. "Threshold Effects of Economic Growth on Air Pollution under Regimes of Corruption," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(1), pages 1046-1059.
  7. Judith A. Clarke & Nilanjana Roy & Weichun Chen, 2012. "Health and Wealth: Short Panel Granger Causality Tests for Developing Countries," Econometrics Working Papers 1204, Department of Economics, University of Victoria.
  8. Hartwig, Jochen, 2010. "Is health capital formation good for long-term economic growth? - Panel Granger-causality evidence for OECD countries," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 314-325, March.
  9. Arshia Amiri & Ulf-G Gerdtham & Bruno Ventelou, 2012. "A new approach for estimation of long-run relationships in economic analysis using Engle-Granger and artificial intelligence methods," Working Papers halshs-00606048, HAL.
  10. Lukasz Marc, 2014. "The Causal Links between Aid and Government Expenditures," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 14-012/V, Tinbergen Institute.
  11. António Afonso & Sebastian Hauptmeier, 2009. "Public Debt and Economic Growth: a Granger Causality Panel Data Approach," Working Papers Department of Economics 2009/24, ISEG - School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, University of Lisbon.
  12. Saten Kumar, 2013. "Systems GMM estimates of the health care spending and GDP relationship: a note," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 503-506, June.
  13. Arshia Amiri & Ulf-g Gerdtham & Bruno Ventelou, 2012. "HIV/AIDS-GDP Nexus? Evidence from panel-data for African countries," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(1), pages 1060-1067.
  14. Edward M Feasel & Nobuyuki Kanazawa, 2013. "Sentiment toward Trading Partners and International Trade," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 39(3), pages 309-327.
  15. Kirsi Mukkala & Hannu Tervo, 2012. "Regional airports and regional growth: which way does the causality run?," ERSA conference papers ersa12p642, European Regional Science Association.
  16. João Sousa Andrade & Marta Simões & Adelaide Duarte, 2013. "Despesa Pública em Educação e Saúde e Crescimento Económico: Um Contributo para o Debate sobre as Funções Sociais do Estado," GEMF Working Papers 2013-18, GEMF - Faculdade de Economia, Universidade de Coimbra.
  17. Tervo, Hannu, 2010. "Cities, hinterlands and agglomeration shadows: Spatial developments in Finland during 1880-2004," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(4), pages 476-486, October.
  18. Clemens Kool & Erik de Regt & Tom van Veen, 2013. "Money Overhang, Credit Overhang and Financial Imbalances in the Euro Area," CESifo Working Paper Series 4476, CESifo Group Munich.
  19. Declan French, 2012. "Causation between health and income: a need to panic," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 583-601, April.

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