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Anticipated effects of the minimum wage on prices

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  • Sara Lemos

Abstract

There is little empirical evidence on the effect of minimum wage increases on prices, particularly for developing countries. This paper provides estimates of this effect using monthly Brazilian household and firm data over 18 years. As minimum wage increases in Brazil sare large and frequent, they have a potentially important impact on aggregate prices. Rational agents, in anticipation of such price effects, may take minimum wage increases as a signal for future price and wage bargains. We find that the minimum wage raises overall prices not only on the month of the increase, but also in the two months prior to the change as well as after the change.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 38 (2006)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 325-337

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:38:y:2006:i:3:p:325-337

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  1. Daniel Aaronson, 2001. "Price Pass-Through And The Minimum Wage," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(1), pages 158-169, February.
  2. Pinelopi K. Goldberg & Michael M. Knetter, 1996. "Goods Prices and Exchange Rates: What Have We Learned?," NBER Working Papers 5862, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Sara lemos, 2004. "The Effect of the Minimum Wage on Prices," Discussion Papers in Economics 04/7, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  4. Jaehwan Park & Ronald Ratti, 1998. "Stationary data and the effect of the minimum wage on teenage employment," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(4), pages 435-440.
  5. Weiss, Y., 1992. "Inflation and price Adjustment : A Susvey of Findings from Micro-Data," Papers 3-92, Tel Aviv - the Sackler Institute of Economic Studies.
  6. Stephen Machin & Alan Manning, 1992. "Minimum Wages," CEP Discussion Papers dp0080, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  7. Stephen Machin & Alan Manning & Lupin Rahman, 2003. "Where the Minimum Wage Bites Hard: Introduction of Minimum Wages to a Low Wage Sector," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(1), pages 154-180, 03.
  8. David Neumark & William Wascher, 1992. "Employment effects of minimum and subminimum wages: Panel data on state minimum wage laws," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 46(1), pages 55-81, October.
  9. Sara Lemos, 2004. ""Minimum Wage Policy and Employment Effects: Evidence from Brazil”," Journal of LACEA Economia, LACEA - LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION.
  10. Poterba, James M., 1996. "Retail Price Reactions to Changes in State and Local Sales Taxes," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 49(2), pages 165-76, June Cita.
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Cited by:
  1. Messina, Julian & Sanz-de-Galdeano, Anna, 2011. "Wage rigidity and disinflation in emerging countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5863, The World Bank.
  2. Luis Eduardo Arango & Luz Karine Ardila & Miguel Ignacio Gömez, . "Efecto del cambio del salario mínimo en el precio de las comidas fuera del hogar en Colombia," Borradores de Economia 584, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  3. Gabriel Ulyssea & Miguel N. Foguel, 2006. "Efeitos do Salário Mínimo Sobre o Mercado de Trabalho Brasileiro," Discussion Papers 1168, Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - IPEA.
  4. Ernesto Sheriff, 2010. "Inflationary memory as restrictive factor of the impact of the public expense in the economic growth: lessons from high inflation Latin American countries using an innovative inflationary memory indic," Development Research Working Paper Series 13/2010, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.

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