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The 'Home Grown' Presidency: empirical evidence on localism in presidential voting, 1972-2000

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  • Franklin Mixon
  • J. Matthew Tyrone
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    Abstract

    This builds upon the conceptual framework of Lewis-Beck and Rice (American Journal of Political Science, 27, 548-56, 1983), in combination with the empirical design of Kjar and Laband (Public Choice, 112, 143-50, 2002), to investigate home grown-ness in US presidential elections from 1972-2000. It found that, ceteris paribus, home state vote shares for US Presidential election winners are 5.19-15.11 percentage points higher due to the home grown-ness effect. In the eight presidential elections analysed, this study confirms two aspects of prior work. First, the estimate of a home grown-ness effect in presidential elections of 5.19 percentage points (on average), supports the 4 percentage point average found by Lewis-Beck and Rice (1983). Second, that support for the winning president monotonically increases as moves are made away from the opponent's home territory confirms the cascading dummy variable series approach developed by Kjar and Laband (2002).

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

    Volume (Year): 36 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 16 ()
    Pages: 1745-1749

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:36:y:2004:i:16:p:1745-1749

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    1. Klein, Benjamin & Leffler, Keith B, 1981. "The Role of Market Forces in Assuring Contractual Performance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(4), pages 615-41, August.
    2. Telser, L G, 1980. "A Theory of Self-enforcing Agreements," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 27-44, January.
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    Cited by:
    1. Geys, Benny & Vermeir, Jan, 2012. "Party cues in elections under multilevel governance: Theory and evidence from US states," Discussion Papers, Research Professorship & Project "The Future of Fiscal Federalism" SP II 2012-107, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    2. Duquette, Christopher & Mixon, Franklin & Cebula, Richard, 2013. "Swing States, The Winner-Take-All Electoral College, and Fiscal Federalism," MPRA Paper 55423, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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