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The determinants and labour market effects of lifelong learning

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  • Andrew Jenkins
  • Anna Vignoles
  • Alison Wolf
  • Fernando Galindo-Rueda

Abstract

Despite the policy importance of lifelong learning, there is very little hard evidence from the UK on (a) who undertakes lifelong learning and why, and (b) the economic benefits of lifelong learning. This paper uses a rich longitudinal panel data set to look at key factors that determine whether someone undertakes lifelong learning and then models the effect of the different qualifications acquired via lifelong learning on individuals' economic outcomes, namely wages and the likelihood of being employed. Those who left school with O-level qualifications or above were much more likely to undertake lifelong learning. Undertaking one episode of lifelong learning also increased the probability of undertaking more lifelong learning. We found little evidence of positive wage effects from lifelong learning. However, males who left school with only low-level qualifications do earn substantially more if they undertake a degree via lifelong learning. We also found important positive employment effects from lifelong learning.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 35 (2003)
Issue (Month): 16 ()
Pages: 1711-1721

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:35:y:2003:i:16:p:1711-1721

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  1. Francis Green & Stephen Machin & Alan Manning, 1992. "The Employer Size-Wage Effect: Is Monopsony the Explanation?," CEP Discussion Papers dp0079, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  2. Card, David, 1999. "The causal effect of education on earnings," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 30, pages 1801-1863 Elsevier.
  3. Steven McIntosh & Anna Vignoles, 2000. "Measuring and assessing the impact of basic skills on labour market outcomes," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19557, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  4. Rees, Hedley & Shah, Anup, 1995. "Public-Private Sector Wage Differential in the U.K," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 63(1), pages 52-68, March.
  5. Lorraine Dearden & Barbara Sianesi, 2001. "Estimating the Returns to Education: Models, Methods and Results," CEE Discussion Papers 0016, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  6. Lorraine Dearden & Steven McIntosh & Michal Myck & Anna Vignoles, 2000. "The Returns to Academic and Vocational Qualifications in Britain," CEE Discussion Papers 0004, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  7. Barbara Sianesi & John Van Reenen, 2003. "The Returns to Education: Macroeconomics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(2), pages 157-200, 04.
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