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The determinants and labour market effects of lifelong learning

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Author Info

  • Andrew Jenkins
  • Anna Vignoles
  • Alison Wolf
  • Fernando Galindo-Rueda

Abstract

Despite the policy importance of lifelong learning, there is very little hard evidence from the UK on (a) who undertakes lifelong learning and why, and (b) the economic benefits of lifelong learning. This paper uses a rich longitudinal panel data set to look at key factors that determine whether someone undertakes lifelong learning and then models the effect of the different qualifications acquired via lifelong learning on individuals' economic outcomes, namely wages and the likelihood of being employed. Those who left school with O-level qualifications or above were much more likely to undertake lifelong learning. Undertaking one episode of lifelong learning also increased the probability of undertaking more lifelong learning. We found little evidence of positive wage effects from lifelong learning. However, males who left school with only low-level qualifications do earn substantially more if they undertake a degree via lifelong learning. We also found important positive employment effects from lifelong learning.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 35 (2003)
Issue (Month): 16 ()
Pages: 1711-1721

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:35:y:2003:i:16:p:1711-1721

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References

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  1. McIntosh, Steven & Vignoles, Anna, 2001. "Measuring and Assessing the Impact of Basic Skills on Labour Market Outcomes," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 453-81, July.
  2. Card, David, 1999. "The causal effect of education on earnings," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 30, pages 1801-1863 Elsevier.
  3. Francis Green & Stephen Machin & Alan Manning, 1992. "The Employer Size-Wage Effect: Is Monopsony the Explanation?," CEP Discussion Papers dp0079, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Rees, Hedley & Shah, Anup, 1995. "Public-Private Sector Wage Differential in the U.K," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 63(1), pages 52-68, March.
  5. Lorraine Dearden & Barbara Sianesi, 2001. "Estimating the Returns to Education: Models, Methods and Results," CEE Discussion Papers 0016, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  6. Lorraine Dearden & Steven McIntosh & Michal Myck & Anna Vignoles, 2000. "The Returns to Academic and Vocational Qualifications in Britain," CEE Discussion Papers 0004, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  7. Barbara Sianesi & John Van Reenen, 2003. "The Returns to Education: Macroeconomics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(2), pages 157-200, 04.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Haroon Chowdry & Claire Crawford & Lorraine Dearden & Alissa Goodman & Anna Vignoles, 2010. "Widening Participation in Higher Education: Analysis Using Linked Administrative Data," DoQSS Working Papers 10-08, Department of Quantitative Social Science - Institute of Education, University of London.
  2. Beblavý, Miroslav & Thum, Anna-Elisabeth & Potjagailo, Galina, 2013. "When do adults learn? A cohort analysis of adult education in Europe," CEPS Papers 8059, Centre for European Policy Studies.
  3. Andrew Jenkins, 2004. "Women, lifelong learning and employment," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19467, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  4. Bergemann, Annette & van den Berg, Gerard J., 2014. "From giving birth to paid labor: the effects of adult education for prime-aged mothers," Working Paper Series 2014:5, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  5. Banerjee, Rupa & Verma, Anil, 2009. "Determinants and Effects of Post-Migration Education Among New Immigrants in Canada," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-20, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 11 Mar 2009.
  6. Charley Greenwood & Andrew Jenkins & Anna Vignoles, 2007. "The Returns to Qualifications in England: Updating the Evidence Base on Level 2 and Level 3 Vocational Qualifications," CEE Discussion Papers 0089, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  7. L Feinstein & Fernando Galindo-Rueda & Anna Vignoles, 2004. "The Labour Market Impact of Adult Education and Training: A cohort analysis," CEE Discussion Papers 0036, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  8. Bailey, Mark F & Borooah, Vani, 2010. "What Enhances Mathematical Ability? A Cross-Country Analysis Based on Test Scores of 15-year Olds," MPRA Paper 25676, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Anders Stenberg, 2007. "Comprehensive education or vocational training for the unemployed?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 28(1), pages 42 - 61, May.
  10. Andrew Jenkins, 2004. "Women, Lifelong Learning and Employment," CEE Discussion Papers 0039, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  11. Stenberg, Anders & Westerlund, Olle, 2004. "Does Comprehensive Education Work for the Long-term Unemployed?," UmeÃ¥ Economic Studies 641, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
  12. Uschi Backes-Gellner & Johannes Mure & Simone Tuor, 2006. "The Puzzle of Non-Participation in Continuing Training – An Empirical Study of Permanent vs. Occasional Non-Participation," Working Papers 0058, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
  13. Anna Vignoles & Augustin de Coulon, 2008. "An Analysis of the Benefit of NVQ2 Qualifications Acquired at Age 26-34," CEE Discussion Papers 0106, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  14. Hällsten, Martin, 2012. "Is it ever too late to study? The economic returns on late tertiary degrees in Sweden," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 179-194.
  15. Pilar Olave & Manuel Salvador, 2006. "The efficacy of university training programmes: a semi-parametric Bayesian approach," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(8), pages 511-518.
  16. Thomas Gries & Stefan Jungblut & Tim Krieger & Henning Meier, 2009. "Statutory Retirement Age and Lifelong Learning," Working Papers 9, University of Paderborn, CIE Center for International Economics.

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